Executives-for-hire help biotech startups get off the ground

first_imgBusinessExecutives-for-hire help biotech startups get off the ground “They need someone who’s experienced, but they can’t really afford it,” Mazanet said. “And people who are very experienced usually don’t want to just do one thing.”In other words, “You don’t hire a CMO, you hire half of a CMO, or a third of a CMO,” Mazanet said, referring to chief medical officers.Mazanet, who has been doing this work for about four years, juggles between multiple email accounts and various stacks of business cards with ease. She prefers not to take formal titles with the companies she works with, but others accumulate titles of chief financial officer, chief operating officer, and even CEO, packing their LinkedIn profiles with an array of corner-office positions that in this case are more often performed from home offices. It’s not clear how many people do this type of rent-an-executive work in the biotech world, but interviews with more than a dozen executives, companies, and observers show it is becoming more common, and more accepted. The trend reflects shifts in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries and possibly the larger labor force. Corporate behemoths no longer dominate drug discovery, instead depending on smaller companies for innovative ideas. That has propelled the rise of “virtual” startups, those with one or two key employees who plug the gaps with contractors and consultants. And across industries, more workers are forgoing long-term employment and setting out on their own.“It’s not like when your grandfather worked for IBM for 30 years,” said Matt Marx, a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management. “You’re more loyal to your craft than your company.”Partners from venture capital firms have for years taken on positions at companies their firms help start. But the newer fleet of interim and part-time executives tend to be free agents. Executives and companies say the arrangement amounts to a win-win. For startup companies looking to pinch pennies or being started by scientists without business experience, they can access people with decades of expertise and pay them just for the work that needs to get done“To be capital-efficient, we don’t have to hire these people full time, we don’t have to put them on our payroll,” said Sena Biswas, a managing director at VIMAC Ventures who tapped Mazanet to work with a Montreal-based company, Angiochem, in which VIMAC invested.As a company grows, it can then bring on full-time executives, often looking first to those who filled the interim role.“Many startup companies, they may not need a CFO from day one,” said John Hallinan, chief business officer of the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council.The part-time execs say there are various perks of their peculiar kind of work. It gives them the chance to work in the buzzing world of startups without subjecting them to the slog of getting one off the ground or the risk of failure. “With what I do, there’s never a dull moment,” said Ramani Varanasi, who consults and is chief business officer at two companies.Although they are like consultants, the part-time executives say the work differs because they enact plans, not just offer guidance.“I don’t just sit on the sidelines and watch as someone drags their feet,” said Arthur Hiller, who serves as interim CEO of a new company called Antyllus Therapeutics and does traditional consulting. “I can actually drive it forward.”Recognizing the opportunity, traditional consulting firms have started staffing C-suite roles for clients. Red Sky Partners, a Cambridge company that started almost a decade ago, has focused more on providing what it calls “virtual operating management” in recent years, said Pauline Jen Ryan, a partner there. And Danforth Advisors, based in Southborough, Mass., was launched four years ago specifically to fill interim executive positions at startup companies. Bouncing between roles does, of course, pose some challenges. A part-time exec indisposed with pitching to investors for one company won’t be on hand to respond to a PR crisis at a second company. Potential conflicts of interest and questions about proprietary information loom. The executives say they sign nondisclosure agreements and won’t take on jobs at competing companies.The model can also lead to some funny circumstances. Mazanet once had a meeting with the Food and Drug Administration on behalf of one company, and had another meeting with the FDA not long after.The FDA officials recognized her, but this time she was representing a different company. Kendall Squared brings you dispatches from the world’s epicenter for biotechnology and drug discovery. In a sun-filled conference room in Cambridge, Mass., on a recent day, Dr. Rosemary Mazanet held court at a meeting with the new drug team of the immunotherapy company Enumeral. In quick succession, the scientists updated her with reports ranging from their tissue sample supply to where animal studies stood.“Will they tell us in real time how the mice are doing?” she asked, moving through agenda items matter-of-factly and jotting notes on a packet of pages in front of her. Indeed, Enumeral would be getting live responses. “That’s excellent,” Mazanet replied. advertisement Soon after the meeting, Mazanet switched gears: She jumped on a call with a California-based company focused on cancer vaccines. Then, that afternoon, she ran a meeting with a biotechnology company looking at gene control, advising it on its research and clinical development plans.A direct employee of none of those companies, Mazanet instead is an executive-for-hire. Other biotech veterans have gone the same route, serving as a C-level executive for a few months at a time or on a part-time basis, often for several startups at once.advertisement About the Author Reprints [email protected] Andrew Josephcenter_img General Assignment Reporter Andrew covers a range of topics, from addiction to public health to genetics. Dr. Rosemary Mazanet, right, meets with a team from Enumeral. Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe By Andrew Joseph Nov. 18, 2015 Reprints @DrewQJoseph Tags biotechpharmaceutical industrystartupslast_img read more

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3 national political leaders who’ll be in the hot seat in 2016

first_img Hillary Clinton hits drug ‘price gouging’ in new ad Here are three key players in national politics to watch in 2016:Stephen Ubl, new president and chief executive, PhRMANo lobbyist in Washington is likely to draw as much scrutiny in 2016 as Stephen Ubl, who took over as president and CEO of the pharmaceutical lobby in November.advertisement Califf was the founding director of the clinical research center at Duke University, and some Democrats are wary of him because the pharmaceutical industry funded some of the studies he oversaw at Duke. They want to make sure he won’t be tempted to allow the FDA to rush new drugs through the approval process without due diligence.At his confirmation hearing in November, Califf promised he would never lower safety standards. But he will face pressure from lawmakers in both parties who want to push the FDA to move faster. The House has passed legislation to speed approval times, and Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) are working on their own version, which will be released in 2016.Califf’s other big challenge: Alexander wants him to do more to cut the backlog of generic drugs waiting for approval — a backlog Califf has blamed in part on incomplete applications filed by the drug companies. By David Nather and Dylan Scott Dec. 28, 2015 Reprints Tags drug pricesFDApolicyThree to watch But the political tide has turned against the industry in the last two years. Satisfaction with drug makers is way down from where it was two decades ago. The industry’s main talking points — including the argument that high prices are justified by hefty research spending — are not resonating with the public.And both politicians and broad swaths of the public want action to make drugs more affordable. Clinton is making it a centerpiece of her presidential campaign, and the Republican candidates have also started to give the issue some attention.Ubl cut his teeth leading a medical device lobby that — just shortly after his departure — finally secured a victory it had long sought: the temporary suspension of a device tax in the Affordable Care Act. Ubl can take a lot of credit for that.But he’ll have his work cut out for him in the year ahead.Ann O’Leary, adviser to Hillary ClintonClinton is talking a lot about rising prescription drug prices, and when she has to flesh out the details of her plan to bring costs down, she’s going to turn to Ann O’Leary, one of her senior campaign policy advisers.O’Leary leads the work on Clinton’s health care policies, including her recently announced plan to boost funding for Alzheimer’s research in hopes of finding an effective treatment by 2025. She shares the domestic policy portfolio with Jake Sullivan, another senior policy adviser. Related: As outrage over prices grows, public sours on the drug industry Other presidential candidates also have health care policy advisers, of course, but O’Leary is the one most likely to end up working for a presidential nominee, given the unpredictability of the Republican race right now and Clinton’s strong lead among Democrats.So O’Leary is the most likely to have to figure out how campaign rhetoric would actually work in practice — and to find strategic ways to keep the issue in front of voters.O’Leary, who lives in Oakland, is a longtime Clinton policy hand: She was Clinton’s legislative director in the Senate and worked on the “Too Small to Fail” program, an early childhood development initiative cosponsored by the Clinton Foundation and the advocacy group Next Generation.Now, she’ll play a big role in determining whether Clinton can sell her drug prices plan, and her other life science policies, to voters nationwide.Robert Califf, FDA nomineePresident Obama’s nominee to lead the Food and Drug Administration is likely to get confirmed by the Senate sometime next year.Once he’s in, though, he’ll be under constant pressure from key Democrats — including Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren — to prove that he’s not too close to the pharmaceutical industry.center_img Related: Related: FDA official took name off papers Charlotte Chua for STAT Ubl’s group, PhRMA, short for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, is used to having its way in the nation’s capital. Politics3 national political leaders who’ll be in the hot seat in 2016 As the year winds down, STAT reporters are taking a look at the stories they’re most eager to track in 2016. We’ll be running these daily through Dec. 31. Look for more New Year’s predictions here.WASHINGTON — The new year will bring challenges for national political leaders grappling with health and medical issues.A new head of the pharmaceutical lobby will have to deal with heavy pressure to bring down drug prices. The next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration will have to balance competing pressures to speed approvals of new drugs without compromising safety.And they’ll all be watching the campaign debate on medical science — which is being driven right now by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, but could also turn to Republican priorities once the shape of the GOP race is more clear.advertisementlast_img read more

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A mayor fights to save a small-town hospital: ‘It’s life or death’

first_img Related: Talia Bronshtein/STAT Source: The North Carolina Rural Health Research Program GIF / Youtube A bankruptcy and a surprise decisionWhen Pungo District Hospital opened in 1949, it was one of the first in the nation to be designated a Hill-Burton hospital, which meant the federal government offered loans for construction in exchange for a pledge to treat those unable to afford medical care.The area around Belhaven — a vast stretch of the Inner Banks that spans several counties and is home to soybean farmers and seniors settling into retirement — long relied on Pungo for everything from childbirth to critical care.But the 49-bed nonprofit hospital struggled financially. It cobbled together a mix of Medicaid and Medicare reimbursements, grant funding, and community contributions, yet still spent a few years in bankruptcy in the early 2000s.By 2011, the Pungo District Hospital Corporation, which owned and operated the hospital, had sustained enough losses to consider selling. It reached out to Vidant, which today owns eight hospitals and serves over 1.4 million patients, and which specialized in nonprofit hospitals. By summer’s end, a deal was reached. Privacy Policy Mayor Adam O’Neal wants his hospital back.He was born in Pungo District Hospital in the sleepy town of Belhaven, N.C. Decades later, as mayor of Belhaven, he counted on the hospital to provide not just health care, but scores of jobs. In his rural stretch of coastal North Carolina — beautiful but isolated, with a painfully high poverty rate — he saw Pungo as the “heartbeat” of the community.That is, until the hospital was shut down on July 1, 2014, less than three years after a much larger health system had purchased it.advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: Vidant started to invest in the Belhaven hospital, including a $2.4 million electronic records system. But in September 2013, Vidant’s board shocked Belhaven residents when it announced the hospital would be closed.Across its entire network, Vidant rang up a surplus of $109.6 million in the year leading up to the closure — but the nonprofit health system lost $1.1 million on Pungo during that period. David Herman, the company’s then-CEO, cited the state’s failure to expand Medicaid as one reason for the shut down; it meant the hospital would continue to limp along without enough insured patients — or revenue — to repair its aging building.Pungo District Hospital in March 2014, before it closed. Eric Byler A ‘crazy mayor raising Cain’It was around then that O’Neal became, as he now quips, “that crazy mayor raising Cain.”Now 47, O’Neal is stocky and starting to gray; he sells insurance whenever he isn’t busy being mayor of Belhaven. More often than not, though, he’s performing those mayoral duties, including the fight to save Pungo.He’s demanded, and received, meetings with top state and federal officials, including North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell. He secured a federal loan commitment and a certificate of need, a legal document the state requires to operate a hospital.Along the way, activists like the Rev. William Barber II, the state NAACP president, and Bob Zellner, a prominent civil rights activist, became unlikely allies.With the NAACP’s help, Belhaven sued Vidant over a breach of contract and unfair trade practices. O’Neal argued that the community board never would have sold if they had known Vidant would shut down the hospital, throwing nearly 100 employees out of work in a county that at the time had a 7.7 percent unemployment rate — well above the national average of 6.2 percent. (A judge later dismissed the lawsuit.)The mayor and his allies also filed federal civil rights complaints that accused Vidant of discrimination against “very poor minorities.” One complaint prompted the federal Department of Justice to mediate a agreement in April 2014 that kept the hospital open for several more months. Vidant agreed to transfer ownership of Pungo to a community nonprofit called Pantego Creek LLC. O’Neal still believes Pungo, which brought in $10 million in revenue the year before it shut down, can operate in the black without Medicaid expansion. He cited multiple plans for doing so, including one that would downsize the facility to 10 beds and another that would turn over part of the hospital to serve veterans.But before the hospital could get back online, the community nonprofit that owns it would have to sell it to a health care operator. It came close this past summer, but the deal fell through.Pantego Creek also rejected two offers from an O’Neal-backed group to buy the building and land because they came in at less than the property’s appraised value of $1 million.“If the property is ever sold at fair market value, the proceeds will be reinvested in the community in some manner,” Pantego Creek attorney Arey Grady wrote in an email to STAT. “For instance, Pantego Creek has discussed the possibility of scholarships for local people interested in studying in the health care field and then returning to the area to work in health care — one of just several possibilities.”With no deal in sight, Pantego Creek voted to tear down the hospital, citing its decrepit state. As a demolition crew prepared to move in, several members of the nonprofit filed suit to stop the wrecking balls.A judge issued a temporary restraining order in late November — and will decide at Wednesday’s hearing whether the demolition can proceed.‘You’re likely going to die’The long fight to reopen Pungo has taken a toll on O’Neal. By his own estimate, he’s poured up to 40 hours a week into saving his town’s hospital.It’s a battle, he said, that has “financially destroyed” him, considering how much time he’s spent away from his day job. It’s also taken away from time he could have spent with his two sons and two daughters. But he won’t give up. He won his sixth term as mayor last year.“I don’t have anything left to lose,” O’Neal said. “In life, sometimes, things are bigger than you are. I ran into something bigger than I am. I can’t let people continue to die.” Tags hospitalspatientsphysicians Rural Hospital Closures: 2005 – 2016Press play or drag the timeline handle to see the locations of rural hospital closures over the last decade. The size of the bubble represents the number of hospital beds.Total for JAN 2005 -MAR 2005 He knows locals who had heart attacks that caused far more damage than they should have because with Pungo closed, it took more than an hour to get them to the nearest hospital with emergency services.“There are people with strokes, who could’ve recovered, but can’t now,” O’Neal said. “There are needless deaths.”Since 2010, at least 75 rural hospitals, including Pungo, have been shuttered in the US. Almost half of those were in the South. These hospitals tend to be as small as the towns they serve — and often are found in areas that many health care providers have ignored.Even those that remain open are struggling: More than a third of rural hospitals operate at a loss, according to the National Rural Health Association. One in four is at risk of closing in the next decade. Ever since, O’Neal has fought to revive the hospital. His last chance may come Wednesday as Belhaven residents go to court to try to block its demolition. The mayor sees it, quite literally, as a matter of life and death.“I keep seeing pain in my community, people calling me crying, and that’s why I’m hollerin’ and fussin’,” O’Neal said.advertisement Hospitals scramble to offer mental health care for depressed physicians Adam O’Neal, mayor of Belhaven, N.C., went to the state capitol to talk about his town’s shuttered hospital. Gray Whitley/The Wilson Times/AP Related: Please enter a valid email address. Hospitals struggle to address terrifying and long-lasting ‘ICU delirium’ ’06’07’08’09’10’11’12’13’14’15’161050100 beds NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. In communities like Belhaven, a majority-black town where nearly 1 in 3 residents lives below the poverty line, a hospital closure leaves locals in dire straits.Many in the Belhaven area lack insurance — North Carolina did not expand Medicaid under Obamacare — and don’t have transportation to get to the nearest safety-net hospital, located about 25 miles to the west.Belhaven salon owner Eunice Williams, who lives outside of town — nearly 50 miles east of the nearest open hospital — said many people she knows rely on free rides from their neighbors to get care when they need it. “A lot of people can’t even afford gas to get to Belhaven,” she said.After shutting the hospital, Vidant Health, one of the largest health care systems in North Carolina, built an around-the-clock urgent care center in town. It opened this past summer, offering primary and preventive care, prenatal and cardiac consultations, and a helipad for emergency transport. Vidant spokesperson Christine Mackey said the company believes the urgent care model “is the right direction for communities like Belhaven.”O’Neal and his allies say it’s not enough.In his quest to save Pungo, O’Neal has marched more than 700 miles, trekking to Washington, D.C., on foot multiple times, as well as to the statehouse in Raleigh, usually wearing a “Save Our Hospital” T-shirt. With the help of progressive black activists, including the NAACP, the conservative white mayor has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars in futile attempts to buy back the hospital property.The diverse coalition was on full display earlier this month as the Rev. Curtis Everette Gatewood, field director of NAACP’s state branch, led a couple dozen protesters in “Save Our Hospital” chants outside the governor’s mansion in Raleigh. O’Neal stood nearby, clad in his hospital T-shirt, lining up speakers for the parade of local TV reporters.“Whether you’re from Belhaven or New York, whenever a local hospital closes, that is our hospital,” Gatewood told the protesters. “Those are our people dying, because we are part of a larger family of humanity.” Patient navigators can serve crucial roles in hospitals Related: He can’t shake the memory of the first death after Pungo’s closure.The week after the hospital was closed, Portia Gibbs, a 48-year-old mother who lived east of Belhaven, died from a heart attack after a helicopter took more than an hour to arrive so it could lift her to the next closest hospital. Her husband, Barry Gibbs, believed she would have survived had Pungo remained opened. He now worries about what might happen to him.“If you live in this area, you might as well have the mind-set that if anything happens to your [health], you’re likely going to die,” Barry Gibbs said.O’Neal is hoping the lawsuit buys a little time. Earlier this month, he scored a meeting with several top state lawmakers after the protest outside the governor’s mansion. Those lawmakers suggested state funding may become available next year to help reopen the hospital.O’Neal is hopeful, but refuses to get too excited. There’s no saving a hospital next year if the judge green lights the demolition this week. The heartbeat of his hometown hangs on this hearing.“It’s a matter of life or death,” O’Neal said.Correction: A previous version of this story misstated the genders of O’Neal’s children. By Max Blau Dec. 21, 2016 Reprints HospitalsA mayor fights to save a small-town hospital: ‘It’s life or death’ last_img read more

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Scientists hope to strike malaria where it lives — in mosquitoes — with a deadly fungus but without fireworks

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Scientists hope to strike malaria where it lives — in mosquitoes — with a deadly fungus but without fireworks When discovered over a hundred years ago, the fungus was simply called “insect killer.” Now, scientists want to enlist the spores in the fight against malaria.Researchers have been using fungal spores to wage war against insects for over a hundred years, mostly targeting agricultural pests like the wheat cockchafer in Russia and the pine moth caterpillar in China. These alien-like fungi largely ignore human beings but eagerly burrow through the chitinous exoskeletons of insects and eat the arthropods from the inside out. What is it? What’s included? By Ike Swetlitz May 17, 2017 Reprints Log In | Learn More Tags infectious diseasepublic healthresearchSTAT+ STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED In the Lab An Anopheles gambiae mosquito. CDC Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDlast_img read more

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Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings

first_img GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. @Pharmalot What is it? Alex Hogan/STAT About the Author Reprints Ed Silverman Log In | Learn More STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included?center_img Pharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings [email protected] Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Hired someone new and exciting? Promoting a rising star? Finally solved that hard-to-fill spot?Share the news with us, and we’ll share it with others. That’s right. Send us your changes, and we’ll find a home for them. Don’t be shy. Everyone wants to know who is coming and going. By Ed Silverman May 19, 2017 Reprints Tags pharmaceuticalsrecruitingSTAT+last_img read more

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Opioid maker is slammed by FDA for omitting risk info in materials given to docs

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags opioidspharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+ What is it? By Ed Silverman Sept. 6, 2017 Reprints About the Author Reprints [email protected] Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. In the midst of a worsening crisis over opioid use and prescribing, you might think a company would take every precaution to ensure its medicine is marketed carefully to physicians.But one small drug maker failed to do so — in a big way. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTEDcenter_img What’s included? Ed Silverman APStock Opioid maker is slammed by FDA for omitting risk info in materials given to docs STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More @Pharmalot Pharmalot last_img read more

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A biotech scorecard: Taking stock of the industry’s make-or-break September

first_imgBiotechA biotech scorecard: Taking stock of the industry’s make-or-break September advertisement Alex Hogan/STAT Damian Garde As always, for more coverage of these companies (and many others), check out STAT Plus. By Damian Garde Sept. 20, 2017 Reprints @damiangarde center_img Tags biotechnology National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. This has been a September to remember for the biotech industry.Just before the month opened, Novartis won a pioneering — and ahead-of-schedule — FDA approval with a CAR-T for blood cancer. And the news has just kept on rolling in from there, from Alnylam’s hit on its rare disease RNAi therapy to Axovant’s stock-crushing miss on Alzheimer’s.On the last day of the month, we fill in our final blank spot, adding the champagne emoji to mark Zogenix’s big win.advertisement [email protected] About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

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Bernie Sanders introduces bill to impose jail time for execs behind opioid crisis

first_imgPolitics WASHINGTON — Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) will introduce a bill Tuesday that would impose jail time for pharmaceutical executives whose companies engage in manipulative practices when marketing opioids.The legislation would impose a 10-year minimum prison sentence and fines equal to an executive’s compensation package if the individual’s company is found to have illegally contributed to the opioid crisis. It would also impose an additional fine on those companies of $7.8 billion — one-tenth the annual cost of the crisis, per a 2016 estimate. [email protected] By Lev Facher April 17, 2018 Reprints Log In | Learn More Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) Alex Wong/Getty Images @levfacher What is it? GET STARTED Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Bernie Sanders introduces bill to impose jail time for execs behind opioid crisis Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What’s included? Lev Facher About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

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The fight to save lives at the world’s deadliest race

first_img Tags physicians Exclusive analysis of biopharma, health policy, and the life sciences. ISLE OF MAN — Two hundred fifty-two people have died racing motorcycles here. There is no room for error at the TT.Since 1907, the Isle of Man has hosted the “Tourist Trophy,” or TT, a 37-mile motorcycle race that winds through this small British isle at speeds matching that of a high-speed train. The high-speed train has it easy. Riders here must navigate through hairpin bends, bumps, jumps, and manhole covers while passing perilously close to stone walls, buildings, and roadside spectators — at speeds approaching 200 mph.Medical volunteers travel to the island each year to try to save lives. STAT had exclusive access to these track-side doctors, paramedics, and marshals as they worked. Two helicopters, six ambulances, and a medical response car cover the course and allow the team to respond to incidents within six minutes. (Despite their efforts, four riders died during this year’s race.)The race draws huge crowds and hundreds of riders from across the world to watch and take part in the spectacle. “What the spectators see and the marshals and the medics see are riders doing things that are really a celebration of the human spirit,” said Gareth Davies, codirector of Manx Roadracing Medical Services. “There is no rationale for a riding around this track as fast as you can — as much as there’s no real rationale for climbing mountains as quickly as you can or as high as you can.”The Isle of Man TT is celebrating its 110th year in 2017, and the medical team remains a crucial part of keeping the race as safe as possible. Watch STAT’s exclusive video now to see the challenges of delivering medicine under such extreme conditions. Special ReportThe fight to save lives at the world’s deadliest race By Dominic Smith Dec. 6, 2016 STAT+:last_img read more

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Patients in landmark genome-editing trial show improvement — but with questions over whether the therapy did the trick

first_img Log In | Learn More Patients in landmark genome-editing trial show improvement — but with questions over whether the therapy did the trick By Adam Feuerstein Sept. 5, 2018 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? @adamfeuerstein GET STARTED Alex Hogan/STAT Biotech STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Tags biotechnologyCRISPRdrug developmentSTAT+ Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Two patients with a rare inherited disease are showing early signs of improvement after being injected with a groundbreaking genome-editing fix from Sangamo Therapeutics.That’s the encouraging news emphasized by the biotech on Wednesday from its latest clinical trial, the first in which gene-editing is being used in patients to try to repair disease-causing DNA. But Sangamo is simultaneously downplaying other results from the study that are more confounding and may give outsiders reason to be concerned. [email protected] About the Author Reprints Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. What’s included? Adam Feuersteinlast_img read more

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