UK not looking to delay Article 50, says Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay

first_img Jessica Clark The UK is not looking to extend Article 50, Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay has said, rebuffing reports that officials were seeking to move the 29 March deadline date.The Telegraph reported that British and European officials are discussing the possibility of extending Britain’s formal notice to withdraw from the EU. whatsapp UK not looking to delay Article 50, says Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com Tuesday 8 January 2019 9:52 am Share “The government’s policy is clear on this, the prime minister has said it on many an occasion: We are leaving the European Union on the 29th of March. We are not looking to extend,” Barclay told Sky News.The Telegraph cited three unidentified EU sources as saying British officials had been “putting out feelers” and “testing the waters” on an extension of Article 5 amid fears a Brexit deal will not be approved by March 29.Plans for a no-deal Brexit have been ramped up in recent days while Prime Minister Theresa May is preparing for MPs to vote on her withdrawal agreement on 15 January.If the deal is rejected, Britain faces leaving the EU on 29 March without a deal.Yesterday around 90 lorries rehearsed a no-deal Brexit journey from a disused Kent airport to the port of Dover. whatsapp Tags: Brexit People Theresa Maylast_img read more

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Fearless girl statue who faced down Wall Street bull comes to London Stock Exchange

first_img More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com Wednesday 6 March 2019 4:01 pm Share whatsapp The “fearless girl” statue, which was was installed on Wall Street in 2017 facing down the statue of a charging bull, has come to London to mark international women’s day.The bronze statue was installed today in Paternoster Square against the backdrop of St Paul’s Cathedral and adjacent to the London Stock Exchange. Read more: High-earning women ‘won’t be on level par with men for 36 years’It was commissioned by asset manager State Street Global Advisers as part of a campaign to increase diversity on boards and at senior leadership level.The statue, which is by American sculptor Kristen Visbal, is 130cm tall and weighs about 110kg.Lori Heinel, deputy global chief investment officer for State Street Global Advisors said. “Studies have shown that companies with greater gender diversity at the senior leadership levels generate better returns than their peers. That drives our conviction to continue our engagement and voting efforts as we look to make further progress on this important topic.”Read more: Women must break our political barriers – society is counting on it whatsapp Catherine McGuinness, chair of the policy and resources committee at the City of London Corporation said: “This builds upon the City of London Corporation’s continuing efforts to increase the recognition of women in the City’s public realm.”London Stock Exchange chief executive David Schwimmer said: “The London Stock Exchange Group fully supports her mission of raising awareness of the importance of diversity on boards and within senior corporate leadership.” by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthParenting FactorLily From The AT&T Ads Is Causing A Stir For One ReasonParenting FactorInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment GuruPost FunRare Photos Show Us Who Meghan Markle Really IsPost FunNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyLady GreatMaggie Wheeler Had To Live Like This Before ‘Friends’ HappenedLady GreatZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite Herald Fearless girl statue who faced down Wall Street bull comes to London Stock Exchange James Booth Tags: Company London Stock Exchange Grouplast_img read more

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Clariant to sell pigments business in $951m deal

first_img Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Damian Shepherd The sale, which is expected to be completed next year, is the final stage in the divestment and repositioning programme announced by Swiss-based Clariant in July 2018. “Now our focus can fully be on growing revenue and profitability of our core business areas: Care Chemicals, Catalysis and Natural Resources,” said Conrad Keijzer, chief executive of Clariant. Chemicals firm Clariant has agreed to sell its pigments business to Heubach Group and SK Capital Partners in a deal which values the company at $951m. Share Monday 14 June 2021 10:34 am Also Read: Draper Esprit’s tech bets pay off as portfolio value leaps 40 per cent to £984m Also Read: Ted Baker turnaround slows, swallowing £278m revenue loss and sales dive center_img whatsapp The company has already divested its healthcare packaging and masterbatches business as it looks to raise profit margins and grow faster than its markets. In addition funding the reinvestment, proceeds will go into strengthening the firm’s balance sheet and boosting organic growth. Clariant this morning said it would reinvest to become a 20 per cent shareholder in the business, which employs 3,000 people and has annual sales of around $1.09bn. Following the announcement, shares in Clariant dropped by more than one per cent as markets opened. The sale is expected to be completed next year. (Pic credit: Clariant) Clariant to sell pigments business in $951m deal last_img read more

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Alaska farmers push for hemp legalization

first_imgFederal Government | Housing | Marijuana | Nation & World | State GovernmentAlaska farmers push for hemp legalizationFebruary 18, 2017 by Caroline Halter, KTOO Share:Jack Bennett of Homer harvests hemp in Oregon. (Photo by Maggie Hegarty and Nicholette Sutton)Alaska became the third state to legalize recreational marijuana in 2015, but it’s not exactly ahead of the curve on hemp, which comes from the same plant.Now, with growing pressure to diversify Alaska’s economy, lawmakers are talking about legalizing hemp for commercial purposes — something at least 30 other states have already done.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2017/02/17hemp-_mixdown_.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.For the past year, home builder Jack Bennett of Homer, Alaska, has been working on a model home that he sees as a potential solution to affordable housing and energy in rural parts of the state.He’s using building materials made from hemp.“We acquired a facility for the year, imported the hemp insulation material and started to run experiments to build a brick for cold climate Alaska,” he said.There’s just one problem: it’s illegal to grow hemp in Alaska, so Bennett imports his product from the Netherlands.He’d like to source the product locally.The 2014 federal Farm Bill allows states to grow and harvest hemp through pilot programs.Sen. Shelley Hughes is sponsoring legislation that would establish such a program in Alaska.“I think this is one more opportunity for farmers and Alaskans … and that it’s due time,” she said at the bill’s first hearing on Feb. 8.But moving forward with the program is not as simple as waving a wand and making hemp legal. Lawmakers will have to decide on a regulatory framework that complies with federal regulations without stifling the industry before it even takes off.Sen. Bill Wielechowski criticized the legislation at a Feb. 13 hearing.“It’s uh, requiring that individual to register. It’s requiring that they list their global positioning coordinates where they’re going to be producing the hemp. They’ve gotta register every year. They’ve got to pay fees for applications and the fees have to cover the regulatory costs,” he said. “So, this is big government. I mean, this is extremely onerous.”Don Hart, a farmer from the Mat-Su Valley, also is concerned about over-regulating the new industry.“In order to benefit the farmers in the state of Alaska, it would be better to be able to remove it entirely from AS 17.38,” he said.  “It allows anyone who does not want to see hemp growing in Alaska to be able to raise the issue by initiative or to propose their borough, administrative or municipality to be able to exclude it.”The statute that Hart referred to, AS 17.38, lumps marijuana and hemp together under the same definition, allowing for local control over where the plant can be grown.Alaska cultivated hemp until its ban in 1937 under the federal Marijuana Tax Act.Bennett said the plant did well in Alaska, where it’s not always easy to grow things.He’s committed to helping the industry grow.“Alaska is, uh, it’s said to be in a fiscal crisis, but it’s a positive, it’s our opportunity. It’s our generation that gets to fix it. And hemp might not be the solution, but it’s a solution,” Bennett said. “Give them the freedom to farm, and let’s find out.”The legislation will go to the Senate Judiciary Committee next, pending referral from Senate Resources.Share this story:last_img read more

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Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, September 11, 2018

first_img Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Council RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest By Alan Hartnett – 11th September 2018 WhatsApp Facebook Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Twitter Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, September 11, 2018 TAGSDeaths in Laois Community Previous articleEddie Brennan’s backroom team is revealed while new Laois U-20 hurling manager is also namedNext articlePortlaoise Panthers make winning start to league campaign Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Home Deaths Deaths in Laois – Tuesday, September 11, 2018 Deaths Below are the recent deaths in Laois.Ar Dheis De go raibh a anam.Brigid (Bridie) Kinahan (née Campion)Clareen, Birr, Offaly / Portlaoise, LaoisBrigid (Bridie) Kinahan, Nee Campion late of Clareen, Birr, Co Offaly and formerly Cannonswood, Cullohill, Portlaoise, Co. Laois. Passed away September 9th, peacefully at home surrounded by her loving family. (predeceased by her late husband Michael) Deeply regretted and sadly missed by her sons John, Kieran and Kevin, daughters Brid Gleeson and Frances Kelly, brothers Paddy and Billy, sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, brother-in-law, grandchildren, nephews, nieces, extended family, relatives and a large circle of friends. Reposing at her residence on Tuesday 11th September from 4pm with rosary at 9pm. Removal on Wednesday morning at 10.30am to arrive at St. Kieran’s Church, Clareen for Funeral Mass at 11am. Burial afterwards in Clareen Cemetery. House Private on Wednesday morning please. Family flowers only please, donations, if desired, to The Irish Cancer Society.Henry (Harry) SythesBallytarsna, Abbeyleix, LaoisSuddenly in the loving care of his family. Funeral Arrangements to follow.Essie Boylan (née Grimes)Skerries, Dublin/Portarlington, LaoisBoylan, Essie (nee Grimes), Skerries and late of Portarlington, Peacefully Beaumont Hospital surrounded by her loving family 7th, September 2018. Mother of the late Damian and grandmother to her little angel Amy. Sadly missed by her husband Harry, children Harry Jnr ,Linda, Cora, Martin, Anne, Joan and Maryjo, sisters Mary, Betty and brother Matt, sons-in-law, daughter-in-law, fifteen grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, extended family, neighbours and large circle of friends. Removal to Saint Patrick’s Church, Skerries for 6pm Monday 10th, September. Funeral Mass at Saint Patrick’s Church, Skerries on Tuesday, 11th September, at 10am, followed by Prayer Service at 1pm at Saint Michael’s Church, Portarlington, County Laois. Essie will be laid to rest with her late son Damian at Saint Michael’s Cemetery, Portarlington following Prayer Service.Michael KavanaghBallydavis, The Heath, Portlaoise, LaoisKavanagh, Ballydavis, The Heath, Co. Laois. Post code R32T93A. September 8th 2018. Peacefully surrounded by his loving family, Michael (Mick). Beloved husband of Patsy. Dearly loved father to Michael, Sharon, Richard, Seamus, Niamh and Elaine. Deeply regretted by his loving family, sister Pat,. brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nephews, nieces, relatives, neighbours and friends. Reposing at his residence from 3 pm on Sunday with rosary at 8 pm on Sunday evening. Removal on Monday morning to arrive at The Church of the Assumption, The Heath for 11 am requiem mass. Interment will follow in the adjoining cemetery. House private on Monday please. Famly flowers only. Donations if desired to Charity.Philip MeagherMountrath Rd, Portlaoise, LaoisMeagher. “Larchgrove”, Mountrath Rd., Portlaoise Sept 6th 2018 . In his 93rd year. Peacefully surrounded by his loving family. Philip Thomas. Devoted husband to the late Noreen and father of the late June. Cherished father to Mary, Joyce, Patricia, Billy, Gerry and Philip. Adored pops to his wonderful grandchildren and great-grandchildren Deeply regretted by his nephews, nieces, relatives and friends. Reposing at Keegans Funeral Home, Portlaoise from 4.30 pm on Friday with removal to SS Peter and Paul’s Church to arrive at 6.30pm. Requiem Mass at 1 pm on Saturday followed by interment in SS Peter and Paul’s Cemetery, Portlaoise.SEE ALSO – Deaths in Laois – Monday, September 10, 2018 Facebook Community New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official openinglast_img read more

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Canadian card losses stable despite consumer leverage: Fitch

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Despite ever increasing consumer debt levels, Canadian bank credit card portfolios are not showing any imminent signs of weakness, says Fitch Ratings. The rating agency notes that the significant increase in Canadian household borrowing over the past few years was driven primarily by rising mortgage debt. Other forms of consumer debt also played a part, including auto and instalment loans, it says. “Credit cards, on the other hand, have not played a part in the broader leveraging trend, despite growth in card spending volume, as most Canadians tend to repay their credit card balances in full every month,” it says. Indeed, it reports that Canadian bank card losses have declined meaningfully from their post-crisis peaks. That said, Fitch indicates that it expects Canadian card losses to rise modestly in 2014, “given an expected normalization of personal bankruptcy trends and increased strain on consumers (represented by a rising debt to disposable income ratio).” And, it warns that rising consumer leverage, “does expose card portfolios to a greater risk of loss, particularly in the event of shocks to the Canadian economy, given the relatively high government insurance rates on the banking sector’s mortgage portfolios.” Still, it finds that the banks’ balance sheets would remain robust in the face of rising losses. “We conducted a stress test on the card portfolios of the largest six Canadian banks, using net chargeoff ratios between 7% and 13%, to gauge the impact of a credit shock on banks’ regulatory capital… ratios,” it says. “We found that capital ratios remained solid, even under the most severe stress.” Missing out on debt deferrals cost Canadians billions Keywords Credit cards James Langton center_img Related news Consumer debt driven by new mortgages, but credit card debt at six-year low Households face tougher months ahead: Fitch Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Robo-advisors: more friends than foes

first_img Betterment has developed a division called Betterment Institutional that partners with independent financial advisors to help them provide their clients with online services, such as customer analysis, portfolio building tools and automatic rebalancing, while freeing the advisor to concentrate on the more complex aspects of wealth management and tax planning. Betterment’s investment portfolios consist entirely of low-cost exchange-traded funds that the firm has selected and assembled into customized portfolios to suit client objectives and provide appropriate asset allocation. “You can combine better technology with the advisor’s personal touch,” Stein said. “The advisor can access all our services and products, customize everything for the client and then personally add on the extras such as tax and estate planning. We provide a white label experience, for which statements and other communications can be branded with the advisor’s own name and firm.” By providing a wide array of services, including back office, custodial, performance reporting and secure co-browsing of accounts between advisors and their clients, advisors’ time is freed up to give the personal touch to existing clients and recruit new ones, Stein said. “Managing accounts becomes less time intensive and you can take on more clients,” he said. “The additional automation can allow you to scale your practice, with less time spent executing trades and doing paperwork. Betterment Institutional is a great service for new advisors, it’s like training wheels.” The cost of advisors partnering with Betterment Institutional is roughly 25 basis points on the value of their AUM, but this can be negotiated for large accounts. This is roughly the same cost that retail clients pay. Advisors can then add their own fees for advice on top and Betterment can arrange to have these additional advisor fees incorporated into the client statements and the reporting of returns to clients. The robo-advisor movement is growing rapidly, Stein said, and Betterment has been doubling its AUM every six months, with the pace accelerating even in recent volatile markets. In fact, he said January has been Betterment’s best month ever for attracting new AUM, despite the fact that it has been the worst January in 80 years for the U. S. stock market. Stein agreed with forecasts by Citibank that robo-advisors will control assets of US$5 trillion within a decade: “With the help of technology, we have rebuilt the plumbing for financial services, making it easy to sign up and access those services. It has transformed the customer experience for the better.” Stein sees a huge opportunity in addressing the needs of the mass market, which does not have the means to access sophisticated advice. His target market is retail investment households with less than US$2 million in assets. Many clients have come over from the self-directed or “no advice” side of the business, he said. “Clients today can trade for free, and a diversified investment portfolio can be obtained for almost no fees,” Stein said. “However, advice is more important than ever, whether it’s human advice or advice through technology. About 80% of our clients say they want advice on investing and retirement.” Betterment is not seeking clients with complex holdings in real estate or international assets, he said, but those between 36 and 55 years of age who are building a career and family. “We’re seeing some clients with assets up to US$10 million,” he said. “They’re being offloaded by other firms. A clients with more than $10 million can have a cheque delivered to their kids at college by helicopter, and on a silver platter, but with less than $10 million may not be well served.” Betterment uses customer account analytics to offer some unique and unusual services. For example, if a customer wants to sell some holdings, he or she is immediately sent information on the tax consequences before the trade is executed. The client therefore thinks twice, Stein said, and in 62% of these cases doesn’t follow through with the transaction. In January, Betterment stopped 79% of sell transactions as clients reacted hastily to volatility. “The service saves taxes for the client, prevents attempts at market timing, and results in better long-term performance,” he said. If a client ultimately decides to sell, Betterment has a “tax-loss harvesting” system that finds embedded capital losses in the client’s account that can be used to offset any capital gains and thereby enhance after-tax returns. The firm also offers a “smart deposit” program that automatically invests dividends or any excess cash sitting in the account above a threshold specified by the client. See also: How robo-advisors can help your practice Wealthsimple sells U.S. biz to Betterment Wealthsimple raising $750 million in latest financing deal, valuation hits $5 billion Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news Keywords Robo-advisors Rise of robo-advisors in mortgage business could have an impact BMO’s adviceDirect launches premium service Robo-advisors are on the rise and financial advisors would benefit from making them their friend rather than their enemy, one of the kingpins of the digital investing movement told attendees at the Inside ETFs conference in Hollywood, Fla. on Tuesday. “There is a sense of competition between robo-advisors and human advisors, and it’s a false competition,” said Jon Stein, founder and CEO of New York-based Betterment LLC, the biggest and fastest growing robo-advisor firm in the U.S., with assets under management (AUM) of US$3 billion. Jade Hemeon Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

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Ridgefield students learn about Dia de los Muertos

first_img Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree guestLabel Name*Email*Website 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all commentscenter_img Name*Email*Website guestLabel Ridgefield students learn about Dia de los MuertosPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Saturday, November 16, 2019in: Community News, Youthshare 0 Rebeca Jaramillo and her son, Miguel, explained that the Day of the Dead is a special day to remember and celebrate loved ones who have passed away RIDGEFIELD — Gavin Clarke’s second grade class at South Ridge Elementary School sat quietly at their desks, waiting for their special guest.  When Rebeca Jaramillo came in, their eyes widened. Her hair was decorated with beautiful flowers, and she wore a colorfully embroidered long skirt.  She carried a guitar. This was going to be interesting. Rebeca Jaramillo and her son, Miguel, teach South Ridge Elementary second graders about Dia de los Muertos. Photo courtesy of Ridgefield Public SchoolsRebeca Jaramillo and her son, Miguel, teach South Ridge Elementary second graders about Dia de los Muertos. Photo courtesy of Ridgefield Public Schools“What do you know about the Day of the Dead?” Jaramillo asked.  Many students raised their hands to give answers: It is celebrated once a year.  It is a day to celebrate the person who is dead that you really loved. You put things the person likes around their picture.  “Yes. That is all true,” she said.Jaramillo and her son, Miguel, explained that the Day of the Dead is a special day to remember and celebrate loved ones who have passed away.  Small altars or shrines in homes have photos of loved ones, as well as items representing the four elements: wind, water, earth, and fire. “The earth is flowers,” she said, “especially the cempasuchil, a Mexican flower.”  The wind is represented by paper pennants that flutter in the air. Fire is represented by a candle.  “And water, it is usually something to drink, like tea or juice or hot chocolate. Maybe you don’t know,” she said, “but chocolate is from Mexico.”  A few kids gasp. “Mexico brings chocolate to the world.” This display shows students the types of items that would be displayed on home altars or shrines during Dia de los Muertos to remember loved ones who have passed away. Photo courtesy of Ridgefield Public SchoolsThis display shows students the types of items that would be displayed on home altars or shrines during Dia de los Muertos to remember loved ones who have passed away. Photo courtesy of Ridgefield Public SchoolsJaramillo asked for questions, and one student asked, “Why do you wear flowers in your hair?”Jaramillo smiled.  “These flowers and clothes are all bright colors because I am very happy.  I want my family to see me and find me. In Mexico, you go to the cemetery, and you don’t feel scared.  It is always clean, a lot of flowers, music, food; it is a big party. You should not be scared. Because this is your family, your loved ones.” Jaramillo pulled out her guitar; her son Miguel had a keyboard.  With help from the class, they sang the song Remember Me from the movie Coco.  They passed out coloring sheets. And there was one last surprise: Mexican candy.  Soon the students were eating and laughing and sharing with each other, enjoying a party, like the Mexican celebrations for the Day of the Dead.Jaramillo’s other son, Sebastian, is in Clarke’s class.  Clarke invited parents to school to celebrate their cultural events with his class.  “My class has students from many different backgrounds that represent the future of Ridgefield,” he said.  “I hope that those under-represented communities feel welcomed to share their culture with the students, and I hope the students learn to respect many different cultures in their experience here.”Information provided by Ridgefield Public Schools.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyRidgefieldshare 0 Previous : Friday football: Prairie’s season comes to an end in overtime Next : Camas defense posts a shutout as Papermakers roll in first round of state playoffsAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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‘Knight Rider’ is apparently getting remade into a film—but what car to star?

first_img Trending Videos The 2021 Porsche GT3 nailed a sub-7 minute lap at the ‘Ring, roaring across the line and punching a time of 6:59.927. With added power, more downforce, and extra violence, you can bet the next GT3 RS will shave more than a few ticks off that effort. The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca As for powertrain, bank on a naturally-aspirated engine, namely a 4.0L flat-six delivering over 500 horsepower. If history has taught us anything, there’s a solid chance this new RS will deliver at least 20 more ponies than the standard GT3 which presently makes 503 of the finest German horses. Those are race-spec centre-locking wheel hubs, by the way, in case you fancy changing your own GT3 RS tires at home in your own palatial multi-car facility. Taking a close look at this development mule, there are a few telltale RS parts that crop up in the details. These centrally-positioned dual exhaust tips are a hallmark of the model, along with the altered (but hidden under this camo) nose that’s more friendly to the wind for better airflow. The bumper opening is likely to be bigger to facilitate the inhalation of atmosphere, while all manner of addenda will help with downforce. See More Videoscenter_img RELATED TAGS911PorscheCoupeFlexNew VehiclesGermanyNurburgringprototypeSports carSpy Shotstesting Eagle-eyed gearhead photogs have spied what could certainly be the next-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS undergoing testing at the Nürburgring in Germany.As a certified member of the Big Wang Gang, any GT3 RS is pretty easy to spot—even when draped in black camouflage. As an even wilder version of the already uncompromising GT3, the RS variant is very likely to have more than a few race-focused body parts and the aforementioned jumbo wing. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS RELATED Preview First Look: 2021 Porsche 911 GT3 by  David Booth  | February 16, 2021 We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information.last_img read more

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Troubling Pattern

first_imgSAN DIEGO – When Hank Haney leaned into the microphone last week and said on his radio show that he believes Tiger Woods is battling the yips, and that the issue “isn’t going away,” he was speaking from his own experience. Haney has battled the long-game yips since high school. The problem became so bad, he once lost every ball in his bag during a nine-hole stretch. He found a workaround, a way to manage the symptoms and stay in the game, and he went 122 rounds in a row without taking a penalty shot. “But even during that period of time, I never felt super, super confident over the ball,” he said in a phone interview Wednesday. “I felt like it could happen again at any time.” Haney, who worked with Woods from 2004-2010, has studied the subject extensively. He even wrote a book about the yips, in ’06. The title was “Fix the Yips Forever,” with the tagline: “The First and Only Guide You Need to Solve the Game’s Worst Curse.” “Unfortunately you don’t ever really do that,” he said, laughing. “But it was a better title than ‘Work Around the Yips Forever.’” Not surprisingly, Woods’ recent short-game woes have elicited a variety of impassioned responses. Is he lost? Confused? Or is it something deeper, darker … the y-word?  Haney can’t say definitively that Woods has the yips, of course, because he hasn’t tested him. Woods has insisted that his problems are merely technical – in his news conference Wednesday, he used the word “pattern” nine times. Outspoken ESPN analyst Paul Azinger doesn’t believe it’s the yips, either. He said last weekend that Woods’ chipping and pitching problems could be fixed in “literally minutes.” If that’s truly the case, if Woods’ problems could be fixed in not months or weeks or hours but mere minutes, then Azinger should do the golf world a favor and share the secret. Because Woods is still searching for answers. Because, in reality, the yips are a complex, complicated problem that have befuddled medical experts for decades. Farmers Insurance Open : Articles, videos and photos Most troubling is that there is no known cure for the yips, according to Dr. Gio Valiante, a sports psychologist and Rollins College professor. What Valiante does know is that the issue is three-pronged: Yes, the yips are a psychological problem, but they’re deeper than that. There are neurological and mechanical elements, as well. It’s psychological, because nervousness and performance anxiety can exacerbate the problem. It’s neurological, because, Valiante said, “the cortical maps in the sensory motor cortex are misfiring at a fundamental level.” In other words, when the neurons in the brain are compromised, they stop telling the other muscle groups to be quiet – thus, the involuntary motions. And it’s mechanical, because there are certain techniques that can provide relief, albeit temporary. “People usually go with the theory that there’s only some kind of physical problem, that technically there is something wrong with the motion,” Haney said. “Then they see bad results, and then it becomes a psychological issue, too. “Except the problem with that is that when you fix the physical and you get better technique, and you work on the mental aspect, you’re still left with the yips. It’s always there.” Valiante says the yips develop after years and years of overuse, and there have even been some studies that suggest that genetics plays a role. But it’s important to remember that the yips are not strictly a golf malady. Musicians suffer from the yips. So do writers. People who stutter can sing or whisper. The issue only arises when they try to talk normally. Infielders Chuck Knoblauch and Steve Sax couldn’t throw to first base. Pitchers Rick Ankiel and Mark Wohlers terrified batters with each wild pitch to the backstop. Shaquille O’Neal could knock down free throws in practice, yet brick nearly every attempt in the game. Ian Baker-Finch had the yips. David Duval had the yips. David Gossett had the yips. The list goes on and on. Players have tried just about everything in a last-ditch effort to prolong their careers. While putting, simply orientating your hand in a different position relative to the hole can smooth out the stroke. That’s why more players have turned to the claw, saw and pencil grips. Kevin Stadler has even gone to putting left-handed. Duval was a former world No. 1, but his problems began when his club went across the line at the top of his swing. During his prime he always cut the ball, but he soon developed a two-way miss and began hooking the ball. Cue the decline. Most experts agree, however, that the chipping yips are the most serious form. With the driving yips, players can still scramble from the rough. With the putting yips, players are usually left with only a tap-in. But with the chipping yips, players are faced with essentially the exact same shot after a chunked wedge or a bladed chip. Even worse, there isn’t really an alternative way to work around it. Players have tried split and cross-handed grips, but those haven’t proven effective over time. There is a player on the European Tour this year, Jason Palmer, who now chips one-handed. “That may give you some relief,” Haney said, “but there’s no cure for this.” For the past few months, Woods has talked repeatedly about release points and swing patterns and the bottom of his swing. At Isleworth, he flubbed numerous shots around the green. It was alarming, but not totally unexpected: It was Woods’ first tournament in four months, he was in the early stages of his work with new swing consultant Chris Como, and he was one of several players who struggled to pinch pitch shots off the tight, into-the-grain Bermuda grass. Last week in Phoenix, though, the issue seemed even more widespread. There was a shanked shot out of the bunker, multiple chunked pitches and bladed chips. Indeed, it was a stunning development: One of the game’s greatest short-game magicians seemed gripped by fear and indecision, even while faced with straightforward shots. “It’s a hard game, it’s a hard problem, and you kind of have to play around it,” Haney said. “He’s got to figure out something that’s quite a bit different than what he’s doing to give him some better shots and relief, and it’s a slow process to build up your confidence. “Will he ever be as confident off of those (tight) lies at Isleworth as he once was? No. He never will be. It’s in your mind now, and that’ll never get out of there, no matter how many good shots you hit.” No player in the sport’s history has had every shot scrutinized like Woods. Even on the range Wednesday there were at least a dozen people with cellphones and cameras, just waiting for his next miscue. The pressure to perform must be suffocating, so it’s little surprise that Woods has deflected attention away from the mental aspect and said that this is simply a technical issue – that the release pattern under Sean Foley is markedly different than the one he is working on now. Such an explanation helps shield his confidence, and it also buys him a little more time to turn around his game. “I just need reps,” he said Wednesday at Torrey Pines. “I just need to keep doing it and doing it and doing it, and eventually it will start becoming more natural.” Except that if Woods has the yips, that won’t be the case at all. “You can’t will your way out of them,” Valiante says. “Really, you can relax your way out of them and lower the probability that they will pop up. The more intensely you try, the deeper the problem becomes. “You just can’t hard-head your way through the yips. You’re using your own will against you. The harder you try, the worse you’re getting.” Woods’ road to Augusta continues Thursday, and after last week’s debacle his short game will draw even more attention. If nothing else, it is abundantly clear that this issue can’t simply be fixed in minutes.last_img read more

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