The Valley’s Most Colorful History Museum Is Expanding Into a Massive…

first_imgL.A. HistoryThe Valley’s Most Colorful History Museum Is Expanding Into a Massive New SpaceThe Valley Relics Museum is spreading its wings at the Van Nuys AirportBy Gwynedd Stuart – August 6, 20182215ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItUPDATE (October 29, 2018): The Valley Relics Museum has announced the opening of their new location. Now at 7900 Balboa Boulevard in Van Nuys, the museum will open to the public on November 17, 2018. In addition to more space to show off the collection of SFV artifacts–including some 15,000 relics that were never seen before–the new museum will also include a playable arcade of vintage games, a gift shop selling retro merch, several neon signs that have been refurbished, a display of cowboy costumes and items, space for private events, and spaces for rotating temporary exhibits and collaborations with guest curators.Packed to the rafters with artifacts from the San Fernando Valley of yore—defunct institutions’ neon signs, bicycles manufactured in the Valley, Nudie Cohn’s white Cadillac—the Valley Relics Museum is a wonderfully overwhelming sensory experience. And what’s been on display at the museum’s 4,600-square-foot Chatsworth space is only a fraction of what museum founder Tommy Gelinas has accumulated over the years.The museum closed on Saturday, August 4, and will reopen inside a pair of airplane hangars at the Van Nuys Airport. “We’re absolutely ecstatic about moving into our new location,” Gelinas says via email. The new 10,000-square-foot location doubles the amount of space available to exhibit more of the collection, including items that haven’t previously been seen.https://www.instagram.com/p/BlwAm0LH9k_/“We had outgrown our space years ago and we have been waiting for the right location,” Gelinas says. “We have accumulated such a large amount of artifacts. This will allow us to spread our wings—no pun intended. We can now stream line and curate the museum properly, show items that have never been seen before.”https://www.instagram.com/p/BlxKJ7inNSV/Gelinas was in the news just last week, when it was announced that iconic L.A. hot dog stand Tail o’ the Pup had been purchased by the 1933 Group; the programmatic building was donated to the Valley Relics Museum a few years ago. “I was just honored to have it in my possession to keep it safe,” Gelinas said of being the structure’s custodian.The non-profit museum is asking for donations, the bulk of which, Gelinas says, go toward rescuing and restoring items. The museum also co-presents San Fernando Valley Summer Drive-In Nights, an outdoor film series in Lake Balboa. They’ll be screening Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and Selena on August 10 and 11, respectively.RELATED: If You Grew Up in the Valley, This Museum Will Bring Back MemoriesStay up to date with everything you need to know about L.A. by following us on Facebook and Instagram. TAGSLos Angeles historyValley Relics MuseumVan Nuys AirportPrevious articleDowntown’s Bendix Building Has Become a Haven for Artists Priced Out of the Arts DistrictNext articleThe Pleasures and Pains of Walking in L.A.Gwynedd Stuart RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORAre There Any Lesbian Bars Left in Los Angeles?This Beverly Boulevard Landmark Used to Be the Heart and Soul of L.A.Is Kraft Mac & Cheese Mix the Secret Behind the Smoke House’s Famous Garlic Bread?last_img read more

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News / ‘We need to sail greener, not slower, to cut vessel emissions’

first_img Policy director of the UK Chamber of Shipping Anna Ziou has slammed French proposals to impose speed limits as a way to cut shipping emissions,She claims it would give a “false impression” of the industry taking action. Ms Ziou’s objection follows an outcry from container lines following the French IMO delegation’s proposals becoming public last month. “To achieve a 50% cut in emissions, the shipping industry needs continued investment in green technologies that will allow ships to conduct their business through a range of low-carbon fuels, such as battery power, hydrogen fuel cells or even wind power,” said Ms Ziou. “Shipowners have already limited speeds considerably in the past decade and while these proposals are well-intentioned, slow-steaming as a low-carbon [plan] is just not good enough. “It will give a false impression that the industry is taking action, when in reality it will deliver no meaningful reduction in emissions, and the scale of ambition required for the industry to meet the 50% target should not be underestimated.” Ms Ziou noted that if selected, the plan could penalise companies developing and installing low-carbon technologies and could discourage “meaningful” attempts at cutting emissions. At best, she claimed, speed limits would delay any form of transition to low-carbon fuels and in so doing would store up greater costs for the industry. She added: “Speed reduction could result in supply chains using alternative modes of transport, such as road haulage, which would increase overall emissions. “In addition, ships may call at certain ports that are tidally constrained where a delay of just one hour could result in a knock-on delay of 12 hours to the vessel as it awaits the next tide, unnecessarily creating further emissions during the additional waiting time.” Since The Loadstar first reported the proposals, a division has become clear, with sources suggesting Maersk had objected to them when submitted to the IMO in March. And a spokesperson for Hapag-Lloyd told The Loadstar additional speed reductions “would not be a good solution”, noting carriers had voluntarily reduced speed “a few years ago” leading to significant reductions in fuel burn, and slowing the speed of the entire supply chain. “We invested many millions to technologically optimise ships accordingly,” added the spokesperson. “We believe additional speed reductions are not in the interests of our customers and would have a significant effect on efficiency and supply chain speed. And we would need to invest again into optimising ships for lower speed.” Data seen by The Loadstar shows that container carriers made marked improvements in cutting speed since 2008. However, more recent data suggests ships above 12,000 teu appear to have started speeding up in 2014, and one source claimed ships of all sizes across the global fleet had increased speed in the past year. But Hapag-Lloyd’s spokesperson said: “I would like to see the data; the fact is ships have slowed down.” Despite the objections, it seems there is mounting support for the introduction of speed limits after chief executives from more than 100 shipping companies described climate change as “possibly the greatest challenge of our time” in a recent open letter to IMO member states. © Mrdoomits By Alexander Whiteman 03/05/2019last_img read more

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House Democrats are using the budget process to slam the Trump administration’s Covid-19 response

first_img Log In | Learn More @NicholasFlorko What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprints Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” By Nicholas Florko July 15, 2020 Reprints House Democrats are using the budget process to slam the Trump administration’s Covid-19 response   [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), the top Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee’s health panel. Alex Wong/Getty Images A version of this story first appeared in D.C. Diagnosis, STAT’s weekly newsletter about the politics and policy of health and medicine. Sign up here to receive it in your inbox.WASHINGTON — Lawmakers and congressional staff typically use the annual appropriations process to take on political pet projects — making their views on genetically engineered salmon or soy milk known through the text of bills that allocate funding for agencies like the Food and Drug Administration, for example. Nicholas Florko Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What is it? GET STARTED Tags CongresspolicySTAT+last_img read more

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Lee County deputies save man from sinking boat

first_imgFour rescued from boat hanging over dam in Texas reservoir Advertisement Driver slams parked cars into Lehigh Acres home June 17, 2021 LEE COUNTY, Fla. – Deputies saved a man from a sinking boat off Pumpkin Key Saturday.According to the Lee County Sheriff’s Office, the Marine Unit responded to a boat in distress west of Cayo Costa in Lee County on Dec. 5.Deputies found a white and teal boat that was taking on water and starting to sink. They helped the passenger and pulled him onto their boat.The man was then taken to safety, authorities said. RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementTags: Boat rescueLee County Sheriff’s Officecenter_img June 14, 2021 North Fort Myers man sentenced to over 2 years in prison for counterfeiting money June 16, 2021 Traffic Homicide Unit investigates Sanibel crash that left one man dead June 14, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentsDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 commentslast_img read more

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New research highlights Canadian retirement shortfall

Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Survey finds Canadians aren’t sure how much they’ll need for retirement Snowbirds win legal battle to reinstate out-of-province medical coverage Tomorrow’s retirees are sleepwalking towards a drastic fall in their standard of living in their final eight years of retirement due to highly inadequate savings plans, according to research from HSBC. Based on a recent survey of over 15,000 consumers in 15 markets around the world, HSBC’s study found that, on average, people expect to run out of retirement savings just over half-way into their retirement. IE Staff Keywords RetirementCompanies HSBC Bank Canada Facebook LinkedIn Twitter The average retirement is expected to last 18 years globally and 19 years in Canada, while average retirement savings are expected to last for just 10 years globally and 11 years in Canada. This would leave people potentially unprepared for any additional living expenses in later retirement, such as funding long-term care. Currently 56% of working respondents globally and 55% of Canadian respondents say they are not preparing adequately for a comfortable retirement, with 19% of global respondents and 23% of Canadian respondents not preparing at all. In fact, 42% of Canadian respondents have never saved for retirement, including 47% of 55-64 year olds. “Higher debt levels are pushing Canadians to prioritize immediate needs and wants above longer term financial health. This focus on the short-term will result in many retirees being forced to cut back in later life unless they take action to make up the shortfall while they can,” said Betty Miao, head of retail banking and wealth management, HSBC Bank Canada, HSBC predicts that the situation is only likely to worsen as life expectancy continues to rise around the world. Financial concerns were cited by those yet to retire as their greatest fear about living in retirement, with 57% globally and 55% of Canadian respondents saying they feared financial hardship, and 46% globally and 34% of Canadian respondents worrying that they would be unable to afford good healthcare provision. Yet in spite of this, when asked to choose, almost half (43% globally and 41% of Canadian respondents) of those not yet fully retired are willing to prioritize saving to go on holiday over saving for their retirement. Households in Canada are struggling to meet their day-to-day expenses — with 60% claiming that daily expenses prevent them from saving. Only 15% of respondents are optimistic that they will make up the shortfall once the economy improves. The study also showed how vulnerable retirement savings are to being raided to cover shorter term needs, with 29% globally and 25% of Canadian respondents yet to retire admitting they would dip into their retirement pot to cope with life events such as buying a home or paying for children’s education. Related news Earnings surge for Great-West Lifeco in Q4 read more

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2009 Rocky Mountain Sustainability Summit at CU-Boulder Aims for Campus Solutions

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Jan. 29, 2009 The 2009 Rocky Mountain Sustainability Summit, which runs Feb. 11-13 at the University of Colorado at Boulder, will provide a learning and networking forum for participants from campuses in the Rocky Mountain region to advance sustainability.Institutions of higher education have a crucial role to play in creating a sustainable society and addressing the climate crisis, according to Marianne Martin of the CU Environmental Center. Successful initiatives — whether in research and education, operations, outreach or administration and finance — can have enormous societal impacts by helping to shape the future actions of students, and by setting examples for the larger community.The summit will feature keynote addresses by leading experts, campus administrators and government officials. Speakers include renowned science writer Richard Preston, whose new book is “Panic in Level 4,” and Jerome Ringo, environmental justice champion and president of the Apollo Alliance. Called the “most interesting environmental leader in the United States” by the San Francisco Chronicle, Ringo is a worldwide leader in environmental justice and community organization.A Green Products Expo will share the latest sustainable products and services available, providing a valuable link between universities and businesses and fostering the use and innovation of sustainable and socially responsible products. The summit will include numerous sessions, workshops and facilitated discussions on topics including:o Green curriculao Environmental justice leadership trainingo Sustainable diningo The youth climate movemento Green jobso Transportationo Zero-waste campusesThe 2009 Rocky Mountain Sustainability Summit will help students, faculty, staff, administrators, community members and state leaders learn from each other, replicate successful initiatives and innovate effective programs to make the region’s higher education institutions national leaders in campus sustainability and climate action.For a complete schedule and registration information visit ecenter.colorado.edu/rmss2009/register.last_img read more

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CU-Boulder Unmanned Aircraft Buzz Over Gigantic Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice

first_imgA series of record-setting unmanned research flights are providing University of Colorado at Boulder researchers with some of the first 3-D observations of gaping holes in the Antarctic sea ice known as polynyas and the blasting winds that help form them.Using unmanned planes roughly 9 feet across, CU-Boulder faculty members John Cassano and James Maslanik are gaining a unique glimpse into the Terra Nova Bay polynya, a yawning stretch of open water that at times reaches 2,000 square miles in area, nearly twice the size of Rhode Island. The CU-Boulder team made its first flight Sept. 7, believed to be the southernmost flight ever of any unmanned aircraft.”These will be some of the longest flights on record for science applications, and certainly the longest in Antarctica,” said Maslanik, a research professor in the aerospace engineering sciences department and an affiliate of the university’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, or CIRES.Earlier this year, Maslanik led a NASA-funded project known as the Characterization of Arctic Sea Ice Experiment, or CASIE, which made some of the most extensive unmanned aerial measurements to date of sea ice in the Arctic. Together, the two CU-Boulder-led field campaigns will include some of the highest latitude research flights ever conducted with unmanned planes in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, he said.The goal of the Antarctic mission is to measure moisture and heat exchanges between the ocean and atmosphere and to eventually unravel the effect of polynyas on global climate, said Cassano.”In polar regions, sea ice often reduces interactions between the ocean and atmosphere, but in polynyas, open water persists even in the heart of winter,” said Cassano, an assistant professor in the atmospheric and oceanic sciences department and CIRES Fellow. “It’s in these areas that large amounts of heat and moisture are lost from the ocean to the atmosphere. Instruments aboard the unmanned planes will provide some of the first direct measurements of this heat loss in winter.”Sea ice formation in polynyas also leaves cold and salty water behind, he said. Because the cold and salty water is denser, it sinks, affecting global currents like the thermohaline circulation, said Cassano. The thermohaline circulation works much like an oceanic conveyer belt, moving seawater around the globe through changes in salinity and water temperature. In places where the thermohaline circulation emerges at the ocean surface, it substantially influences weather and climate, said Cassano.The planes will also measure airflow above Terra Nova Bay — which lies between West Antarctica and East Antarctica in the southern part of the continent — to help researchers understand the interaction between the polynya and the severe winds that whip over the Antarctic continent.The winds, called katabatic winds, form as air slides down from the high plateau of Antarctica’s interior and funnels into small drainages near the coast. During the month of September, near the end of the austral winter, these winds can exceed hurricane strength.The constant blasting of the katabatic winds helps keep the Terra Nova Bay polynya free of new sea ice and open throughout the winter, said Cassano. He said he suspects the polynya influences local wind patterns by creating a low pressure area that can spin off small but intense cyclones.”There have been a lot of models and theory-based studies describing polynyas and their climate feedbacks, but we can’t fully understand them until we measure them,” said Cassano.The researchers hope to clock 250 unmanned flight hours over Terra Nova Bay by the end of September. The planes are operated by Aerosonde Pty. Ltd. based in Notting Hill, Australia.A blog by Cassano, including links to video of the first unmanned Antarctica aircraft flight, is available aticestories.exploratorium.edu/dispatches/author/john-cassano/-CU- Published: Sept. 10, 2009 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Holness wants regular audits by school boards

first_img By ATHALIAH REYNOLDS, JIS Reporter RelatedHolness wants regular audits by school boards FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Education Minister, Hon. Andrew Holness, has given stern instructions to school boards to carry out regular and extensive audits of their institutions, stating that investigations by the Ministry have found that school resources are not being managed efficiently. Speaking at a meeting with chairmen and selected members of school boards at the Immaculate Conception High School in Kingston on Thursday May 12, Mr. Holness informed that recent audits by the Ministry have shown that many schools were failing to properly distribute the books given to them under the textbook scheme.  “For many years, we expected that the books we gave to schools were actually distributed. We discovered almost $9 million worth of books packed up in the book rooms of two schools,” he stated. The quantity of books, the Minister informed, could supply 50 per cent of the schools on the textbook scheme in September. He noted that under the National Education Inspectorate to be put in place, principals and board chairmen will be held accountable for how they manage school resources. He urged the board heads to question principals on how resources are being used and to carry out their own investigations to ensure that records and funds are intact, warning that the Ministry will be conducting audits. “If your school is inspected or audited it could very well turn up some things that are embarrassing, so I want to put board chairmen on alert. Don’t wait for us to audit; you need to start asking questions of your school,” he said. “In fact, what we have done is to do a random listing and we randomly audit about 10 per cent of schools every year, but you will be audited, even if it takes 10 years, so don’t wait on us to audit,” he added. Minister Holness said that one of the main areas of concern was the management and maintenance of tuck shops and urged the school boards to “pay particular attention to this area, which is coming up in almost every audit that we do.” He informed that the Government spends more than $2.2 billion on nutrition annually, all of which ends up in the school tuck shops and canteens. “We’re confronted with this issue of the tuck shops operated in public schools that don’t necessarily follow the nutrition policy of the Government,” he said.   RelatedHolness wants regular audits by school boards Advertisements RelatedHolness wants regular audits by school boards Holness wants regular audits by school boards EducationMay 18, 2011last_img read more

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LOS ANGELES – Renaming of Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum criticized

first_imgHomeBriefsLOS ANGELES – Renaming of Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum criticized Mar. 29, 2019 at 5:15 amBriefsCity CouncilCity WideGovernmentLOS ANGELES – Renaming of Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum criticizednews2 years agoLos AngelesLos Angeles Memorial ColiseummemorialUniversity of southern californiaveterans The University of Southern California’s sale of naming rights for Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is being criticized as dishonoring the historic stadium’s dedication as a memorial to soldiers who fought and died in World War I.The stadium has played host to two Summer Olympics, two Super Bowls and one World Series. USC announced last year that the stadium opened in 1923 will be renamed United Airlines Memorial Coliseum as part of a $270 million renovation of the facility.Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn wrote in a newspaper column that replacing “Los Angeles” with a corporate sponsor insults the memories of those the Coliseum was intended to honor. A city-county-state authority gave control of the stadium to USC in 2013. Veterans groups plan to protest at Thursday’s meeting.Tags :Los AngelesLos Angeles Memorial ColiseummemorialUniversity of southern californiaveteransshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentCouncil votes to prevent micro-apartments from becoming major housing supplyNew study analyzes benefits of a potential $4 fee to enter parts of Santa MonicaYou Might Also LikeBriefsLos Angeles Sheriff’s deputy accused of destroying evidence of 2019 assaultAssociated Press12 hours agoBriefsCalifornia State Treasurer Fiona Ma to Speak at Online Santa Monica College Commencement Ceremony June 25Guest Author12 hours agoBriefsNewsBeach House Begins Community Re-Opening June 15Guest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsInput Invited for Marine Park Improvement ProjectsGuest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsPublic Health Emphasizes the Importance of Vaccinations as Distancing and Masking Guidelines Relax Next WeekGuest Author2 days agoBriefsNews“Righting Our Wrongs” performance on June 11Guest Author2 days agolast_img read more

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CommScope takes on Fractus antenna tech

first_img Author Tags Diana Goovaerts HomeLatest Stories CommScope takes on Fractus antenna tech Previous ArticleHMD, Gigaset back Google in EC court battleNext ArticleTop vendors brewing energy efficient 5G kit CommScope agreed a technology transfer deal covering base station antennas with Spain-based Fractus, as part of a deal to settle a patent dispute.Terms of the agreement involve Fractus transferring its entire portfolio of base station antenna patents to CommScope, and dropping a lawsuit filed in April accusing the US-based company of using its technology without a licence.Hearings in the case began earlier this month.The Marshall News Messenger, a local newspaper in Texas, reported Fractus sought as much as $500 million in damages. However, an expert hired by CommScope argued in court the figure should instead fall between $5.7 million and $22.4 million.Farid Firouzbakht, SVP of RF products for CommScope’s Mobility Solutions, said in a statement the purchase would “enable us to offer new and innovative features that will provide significant value to our base station antenna customers”. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 14 OCT 2019 antenna technologyCommScopeFractuslast_img read more

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