A Disability Confident company owned by the Depa

first_imgA “Disability Confident” company owned by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) subjected a disabled member of staff to repeated abuse from strangers after it refused for more than 15 months to make a simple alteration to his parking arrangements.It is now more than 15 months since wheelchair-user Jamie Shield reported to managers at BPDTS that he was receiving abuse from other workers at the Benton Park View complex in Newcastle because of the way he was forced to park his car.Instead of arranging for him to have an accessible parking bay, BPDTS had allocated him two spaces next to each other and told him to park in the middle of the pair of bays (pictured), allowing him space to slide from the driver’s seat into his wheelchair.But from the first day of the new arrangement, Shield began receiving abuse from passers-by, criticising him for parking in the middle of two spaces.The abuse was so bad that he has considered reporting it as disability hate crime.BPDTS was set up two years ago by DWP to provide it with its IT services, and is based at offices run by HM Revenue and Customs in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.The company claims – under DWP’s own disability employment scheme – to be a Disability Confident Employer, for those organisations “recognised as going the extra mile to make sure disabled people get a fair chance”.Such employers must promise they are “proactively offering and making reasonable adjustments as required” to disabled employees.But Shield said: “On an almost daily basis I got colleagues shaking their head at me, gesturing with their hands, or at worst walking past making verbal insults.“Everybody who doesn’t know me and the arrangement thinks I am taking up two spaces.“[Managers] told me there was nothing they could do about it and if I wasn’t happy I could leave my car at home and make alternative arrangements because I was the one who had the problem with parking.”An employment tribunal case he took against BPDTS failed to properly consider these claims of discrimination for legal reasons, he says, and he is now taking a further case against the company.And he is still waiting for other reasonable adjustments to be put into place by BPDTS.Funding was approved in May 2017 for fellow staff to undergo awareness training in Asperger’s syndrome – as he is autistic – but the training has still not taken place more than a year later.He feels he is being victimised and says the discrimination he faces has increased since the tribunal ruling in April. He is now on sick leave.He said: “It would be highly appropriate for them to be taken off the Disability Confident register because by no means are they Disability Confident.”A DWP spokeswoman said: “The matters raised have been heard previously at an employer tribunal. The judgement of which stated there was no discrimination taking place.“We’re not able to comment further at this time due to ongoing litigation.”It is the second time a disabled BPDTS employee has alleged discrimination because of the Disability Confident company’s parking policies.Last September, Disability News Service (DNS) reported how Leonora Bateman was forced to quit her job because she was refused a parking space close to the BPDTS offices even though her mental health condition meant she experienced severe anxiety attacks when walking long distances on her own.The Disability Confident scheme has been repeatedly discredited since it was launched by David Cameron in 2013.Research published two years ago suggested it would be “trivially easy to abuse”, and in May 2017 DWP awarded itself the highest level of membership of the scheme despite being found guilty by the United Nations of “grave and systematic violations” of the UN disability convention.A Civil Service survey in 2016 had also shown how more than 1,400 disabled DWP civil servants claimed they had faced discrimination in the workplace, an increase of nearly a quarter on the previous year.DNS also revealed that among those employers that had signed up to Disability Confident were a company that tried to halve its disabled advisors’ pay; a religious order responsible for decades of abuse of disabled people; and a police force facing two disability discrimination inquiries.DWP’s three benefit assessment contractors – Maximus, Atos and Capita – all heavily and repeatedly criticised for the way they treat disabled people, have also declared themselves to be Disability Confident.last_img read more

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Scores of disabled people who have been held in lo

first_imgScores of disabled people who have been held in long-term segregation in NHS and private sector health settings will have their cases independently reviewed, the government has agreed, after a report by the health and care watchdog.The Care Quality Commission’s interim report found more than 70 disabled children and adults – all of them autistic or with learning difficulties or mental health conditions – in long-term segregation in facilities across England.It came as disabled trade union activists called at their annual meeting for urgent action to address the “tragic inadequacies” that have led to the deaths of scores of autistic and other disabled people in care settings (see separate story).And a new BBC Panorama documentary has revealed alleged abuse at a private sector care facility for autistic people and people with learning difficulties, this time at Whorlton Hall, in County Durham.The allegations have led to the launch of a police investigation and the suspension of 16 members of staff, as well as a Care Quality Commission (CQC) apology for its failure to spot the abuse.The CQC report said one autistic man had been in segregation for nearly 10 years, while one autistic child had been segregated for more than two years, while 16 people had been in segregation for more than a year.The CQC report concluded: “People will continue to be hospitalised and placed in segregation, and become ‘stuck’, unless a different and better system of care is put in place.”It added: “If a period of hospital care is in the person’s interests, this must be provided close to home and last only as long as it remains in the person’s interests.”The report includes the experiences of an autistic boy called Adam, who was admitted to a hospital at the age of 10 and was still there 15 months later, living in a segregated “seclusion room” with padded walls.Staff sit in the corridor behind a locked door, watching him, and shout at him through a window when they want to communicate with him.His education consists of a book held up to a window for him to read.  Staff have still not completed a sensory assessment that might help them understand how to support Adam with his sensory issues, and most of them have only received basic online training in autism, says the report.Of the 39 people in segregation who CQC has visited so far, 31 of them are autistic.One in three of the 39 had faced longer in segregation than originally planned because of “delayed discharges” caused by a lack of a suitable package of care in the community.Some of the hospitals provided their staff with little or no training in autism, with any training often no more than a short module at induction or basic e-learning.About half of the people in segregation were in wards managed by the independent sector and half were in the NHS.The report says: “We have concluded that many of the people we have visited have been let down by health, care and education services, often over the course of many years.”Health and social care secretary Matt Hancock (pictured) this week ordered an independent review of the care of every autistic person and person with learning difficulties in long-term segregation or seclusion.He has also agreed to set up a new group of experts to find a better system of care.But there are already concerns about his plans after a Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) spokesperson said the working group would be made up of “experts, clinicians, parents and carers”, apparently ignoring autistic and other disabled people.CQC had called for the group to include “people with lived experience” of the care system.Asked why the group did not appear to include any disabled people, a DHSC spokesperson declined to comment further as he said the panel had not yet been appointed.CQC has also concluded that it needs to improve its own method of monitoring hospitals that use segregation.The second phase of the CQC inquiry will now look at a wider group of settings, including low secure and rehabilitation mental health wards and adult social care services, and will also look at the use of restraint.Hancock said: “I have been deeply moved and appalled by the distressing stories of some autistic people and people with learning disabilities spending years detained in mental health units.“These vulnerable people are too often left alone, away from their families, friends and communities.  “At its best, the health and care system provides excellent support to people, backed by a dedicated workforce.“But a small proportion of some of the most vulnerable in society are being failed by a broken system that doesn’t work for them.“I commissioned the Care Quality Commission to review the use of segregation in health and care settings to tackle this issue head on.“Today I have accepted their recommendations in full. I hope this is a turning point so everyone receives the care they need.“I will not let these people down – they deserve better.”DNS reported last November how Hancock announced the CQC review more than 70 years after similar concerns were first raised by civil rights campaigners, and following a series of media investigations into conditions in privately-run assessment and treatment units.In a second report released this week, the children’s commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, said too many children were being admitted to secure hospitals unnecessarily.She said some were spending years in institutions, rather than living in the community.NHS Digital figures show that autistic children and those with learning difficulties had spent an average of eight months in inpatient care, while about one in seven had spent at least a year in their current hospital spell with their current provider.The figures show 95 children were staying in a ward known to be more than 31 miles from home.Longfield said there were about 250 such children living in mental health wards in England. At least 75 of them had been restrained in one month – December 2018 – with a total of 820 restraints in just that month between them.Longfield said the quality of care was “highly variable”, with one family saying their son had not been washed for six months, while about one in four children did not appear to have had a formal review of their care plan within the last 26 weeks.A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

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Legendary Civil Rights Leader to Head SF Carnaval

first_img 0% For the 37th year, Carnaval will kick off on the corner of 24th and Bryant streets this Saturday and for two days transform parts of Harrison Street into a multi-block party, while a colorful procession of drummers, dancers, and themed floats snaking up 24th street and along Mission Street, will immerse the neighborhood in various aspects of Latin American culture.With food vendors and free performances by the Oakland-based hip-hop group Los Rakas and Venezuelan salsa legend Oscar D’Leon, the festival’s organizers plan on a “big [freaking] party,” but more important, they hope that Carnaval’s distinction as a cultural institution will unify local residents in their struggle for civil, social, and economic justice while holding on to tradition. “This year, we need to feel the movement [that’s happening in the city],” said Carnaval’s executive director, Roberto Hernandez. “After everything that we have been through, the gentrification, the police killings, the evictions – we need to give people hope and joy.” Carnaval has turned into a celebration of social justice after the ousting earlier this month of Police Chief Greg Suhr — who resigned following the police killing of Bayview resident Jessica Williams — as well as months of community pressure including a 17-day hunger strike that drew national attention to the issues of excessive violence and racism in the police force. Fittingly, Carnaval’s traditional Sunday parade will be led by 86-year-old labor and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, who was named grand marshal of this year’s parade.A leader of the United Farm Worker movement, Huerta became a victim of police brutality in San Francisco during a 1988 protest against George H.W. Bush, who was Ronald Reagan’s vice president at the time.During the demonstration, the then 58-year-old union leader was beaten by police officers, even though she had been “cooperative” – the attack left Huerta with a ruptured spleen and two fractured ribs.“Sometimes, things have to get really bad before they can get better, and I think San Francisco is seeing that right now,” said Huerta.  “We see this blatant racism … and the attacks on people through gentrification, which is not an open attack, but the effects of which are pretty much an attack [on people of color]. “When learning about the beating, Hernandez said he demanded that then-mayor Art Agnos fire his police chief, Frank Jordan. “They ended up removing a bunch of cops, and I got really mad at the mayor at the time. I said fire the chief – he refused.”Regardless, Huerta remembers that the attack had other ramifications. “There was a big shakeup that happened right after that,” remembered Huerta. “They had to change their policies in terms of crowd control.”Speaking on the issues of police reform that San Francisco is grappling with some three decades later, Huerta said she is proud to see the level of organizing that has come out of the city in recent months.“I think the movements of resistance, the fasting, that is so great that they have done this, because ultimately that’s the only thing that will make any difference,” said Huerta, referring to the “Frisco Five” – a five-member group of two rappers, two educators, and a politician who went on a strike earlier this month in an effort to unseat the police chief.“It seems that the city’s fathers are either not listening or they are ignoring,” she said. “The only people that can make [lasting changes] are those that are still remaining there that haven’t been gentrified out of the city.”Edwin Lindo, a member of Frisco Five who is also running for office as the Mission’s supervisor, said the group of hunger strikers were invited to partake in the parade. Lindo, who was born and raised in the Mission, said his father participated in one of the very first processions at Precita Park, where Carnaval started in 1979, and called the event “sacred.” “It’s an honor to even be asked to walk in Carnaval, and to have five hunger strikers be present,” he said, adding that the Frisco Five will march in the parade, backed by the support of a “coalition of black and brown communities and advocates for the homeless” to show Carnaval-goers the results of “people-powered change.”“Carnaval is a platform,” said Lindo, adding that Huerta’s presence is significant in inspiring residents to continue their fight for social justice. center_img Tags: Carnival • dance • mission • Music Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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District Attorney candidates cross swords in SFs Mission

first_img Email Address San Francisco’s four district attorney candidates staked out their positions Wednesday night at 518 Valencia Street, and made it clear their minds were on reform. Though their ideas varied, Suzy Loftus, Chesa Boudin, Nancy Tung, and Leif Dautch — all of whom are bidding to succeed eight-year incumbent DA George Gascon — hashed out such topics as bail reform, shutting down juvenile hall, and how and when to prosecute police shootings. Police Commissioner Petra DeJesus moderated the panel hosted by the San Francisco Latino Democratic Club.Some of the candidates threw around big policy ideas. Among them: Loftus’s proposed “Civil Rights Unit,” a broadly focused group that would examine how the office impacts racial disparities. Loftus, a former Police Commission present and assistant DA under Kamala Harris, said those disparities are still glaring in local criminal justice system. “I stood in front of a room of prosecutors and told them, ‘It’s not your job to exacerbate racial disparities — but that’s what you’re doing, so it’s your job to make it right,’” Loftus said. Another came from Boudin, currently a deputy public defender, who touted his proposed “Wrongful Conviction Unit,” which would establish an civilian advisory board that would examine applications from inmates and the state defense bar and decide whether a second investigation into the crime is warranted. “The City of San Francisco spends millions of dollars settling cases when people have been wrongly convicted,” he said. “And it’s not just about the money; it’s about the lives you’ve destroyed.” Dautch, a prosecutor with the California Attorney General’s office, told the Mission crowd about his plan to be tougher on fraudulent landlords, particularly those improperly using owner-move-in evictions — when a landlord says they or a relative will be moving into a property but in actuality rent it to another tenant at a higher price. Dautch charged that the current DA’s office has hardly prosecuted these kinds of cases. “That stops with me,” he said.Moderator Petra DeJesus (right) and DA candidate Suzy Loftus at last night’s forum. Photo by Julian Mark.Tung, a prosecutor in the Alameda District Attorney’s office and former San Francisco assistant DA, spoke generally about her intention to work more closely with other Bay Area law enforcement agencies to crack down on organized crime, which she said is the source of property crime such as street drug dealing and car break-ins. “They’re people who are getting rich off the misery of others,” she said. Though the four candidates were in agreement on many issues, they differentiated themselves on the issues of police shooting prosecutions and eliminating juvenile detention centers. Both Loftus and Boudin said outright that they supported AB 392, a state bill which would require police to only use deadly force when they have no other options.  Tung did not explicitly say that she support the bill when asked, only offering that it was a “good start” and that she supported more emphasis on de-escalation techniques. Dautch said he was waiting for amendments to the bill before he supported it. However, Dautch pledged he would conclude police shooting investigations in six months (under Gascon many have taken years), would hold a town hall to explain his charging decisions, and would explore the possibilities of charging cops with lesser crimes such as assault with a deadly weapon or negligent discharge of a firearm. Each of the candidates supported winding down the city’s juvenile hall facility except for Tung. “The problem that I have with closing down our secured facilities completely, is that there are still going to be minors that are found by a judge that need confinement …” she said. She said she worried about “farming out” convicted minors outside of their communities. Boudin said he wanted to beat the 2021 date proposed by the Board of Supervisors. Dautch said he not only wants to shut down the facility but transform it into “mental health justice center.” “The era of locking kids up is over,” he said. One of “the issues we do have in the city is the mental health crisis we have on the streets and in our county jail.” The debate was hairier around abolishing the cash bail system, a move that was signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown last fall, but which was put on hold for voters to decide in 2020. All, except for Tung, supported completely eliminating the system — though the candidates said there needed to be more thought around how cash bail would be replaced. Concentrating power in the hands of judges using a risk-assessment tool — whose data can be biased — is still problematic. Both Boudin and Dautch touted their involvement in bringing the state closer to the system’s abolishment. Boudin touted that he argued in front of the California Supreme Court that cash bail was unconstitutional. Dauch was a member of the state Attorney General team that decided not to defend the system. “There’s a lot of problems with risk assessment,” Boudin said. “But what we know is, in our society, liberty is the norm.” center_img Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletterlast_img read more

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SAINTS have announced a twoyear sponsorship with

first_imgSAINTS have announced a two-year sponsorship with Typhoo tea, one of the nation’s most established household brands.As part of the agreement the club’s home and away kits in both 2012 and 2013 will showcase the iconic Typhoo logo on the front of shirt.The brand will also adorn all media back drops, official club stationery, matchday and season tickets, along with over 18,000 branded cups of Typhoo tea which will be served at each home game.Typhoo will also create the ‘Typhoo Family Area’ where young children can go with their parents to enjoy the game.St Helens and the club’s fans will also support the Typhoo Sports for All programme with ‘bucket’ collections at selected games, enabling further funds to be invested in the community sports programme.The sponsorship package, which will be supported by substantial marketing investment, continue Typhoo’s commitment to sport.Typhoo aligned in 2008 with the Federation of Disability Sport (FDS) to launch the ‘Typhoo Sports for All’ initiative, a programme to enable and improve access for disabled people to participate in sport.The campaign was supported by both Sir Geoff Hurst and Martine Wright and to date this programme has trained well over 1,600 community sports coaches, making sport accessible to all.The agreement, alongside a similar sponsorship of power boat racing championship P1 SuperStock, will support Typhoo’s ambitious plans for growth in 2011-12, with the manufacturer aiming to deliver over 15 per cent growth in sales year on year.Keith Packer, Typhoo Tea CEO, commented: “Typhoo is delighted to announce our latest sponsorship deals with two very well renowned sporting brands in the build up to what we know will be a very exciting year ahead. These two opportunities are perfectly aligned to Typhoo’s company values and our continued association with sport, and we look forward to building a long lasting and meaningful partnership with the teams and sporting enthusiasts alike. This is the first of our major initiatives this year with more to follow…”Tony Colquitt, St. Helens CEO, added: “St Helens are delighted to be entering into a partnership with a world class, FMCG brand which will broaden the profile of the club at the most exciting time in its history and widen the exposure of Rugby League to the public.“We look forward to realising the full potential of this partnership and increasing the exposure of Typhoo and Saints via a host of joint initiatives.“Additionally our Community programmes interact with more than 50,000 youngsters so alongside Typhoo’s Sports for All scheme we will be joining forces to get more young people active.”Pictured are Jon Wilkin, Paul Wellens and Jamie Foster with Saints CEO Tony Colquitt (right) and Keith Packer, CEO of Typhoo Tea.last_img read more

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PAUL Wellens says its back to business after the

first_imgPAUL Wellens says it’s back to business after the League Leaders’ Shield celebrations.Saints paraded Langtree Park’s first piece of silverware around the pitch following the win over Castleford but now thoughts turn to next Thursday’s big Playoff Semi Final.“It was a good victory and it was great to celebrate winning the Shield in front of the fans and have our kids on the pitch,” he said. “Now we have to focus on the big game next week and prepare well to come up with a big performance. We will be working hard.”Saints will head into next Thursday’s Playoff Semi Final fresh from a weekend off courtesy of their 41-0 win over Castleford.“It was a fantastic performance from the boys under pressure,” Paul continued. “That is what play-off football is all about; it is about producing on the day and to a man we stood up to the challenge.“Our forward pack laid the foundation and off the back of that Jordan Turner and Lance Hohaia controlled the game which is key in these types of fixtures.“James Roby was phenomenal too. There are only so many things you can say about him that haven’t already been said. He is a phenomenal player who continuously produces at the top level.“The thing is, he is that good on a weekly basis that he gets taken for granted.“I can assure everyone that we don’t take the work he does for granted. He was huge and proved why he is one of the best hookers in the world.”Saints led 13-0 at half time and then cut the Tigers to shreds.And undoubtedly the highlight of the five tries scored in that second half was Turner’s effort after he’d linked with Roby and Sia Soliola.Wellens continued: “We work hard in training and it is pleasing when you put that effort in and it comes off in a game.“We knew opportunities would present themselves if we just remained patient and controlled the ball well. We then capitalised off those opportunities.“But our defence was key too. We had desperation to defend our line particularly at the end of the game. That wasn’t needed for the scoreboard but we knew we needed to do it as in two weeks’ time we will need to come up with those types of plays.”Tickets for the game are currently on sale to Season Ticket Holders.Further details can be found herelast_img read more

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Renewing now means you save on the Early Bird and

first_imgRenewing now means you save on the Early Bird and General Price Membership cost … and that’s before you consider how much value they are compared to matchday prices.For instance, a Hattons Solicitors West Stand renewal is £230 (or £24.32 a month) compared to £276 at Early Bird, whereas one adult & one child in the family stand will cost £250 (£33.30 a month).The Early Bird price is £315.And, if you look at a Gold adult renewal in the North or South Stands … the price is £307 (£32.45 a month) compared to £369 from Wednesday morning.What’s more, you can enjoy the following…Adult MembershipMembership Access CardYour ticket reserved for additional major home games (World Club Series/Challenge Cup)All your Betfred Super League and Super 8s home games included in one great Membership packagePriority match tickets for major games including finals*Exclusive Club news straight to your mobile or other device via emailExclusive local partner offers giving you even more value with your MembershipExclusive Membership only merchandise & stadium promotional offers sent directly to you via emailExclusive news including new signings, via SMS before general releaseExclusive invites to Member only events during 2018Bring a friend for just £5 to a 2018 home match of your choice (excludes Wigan home games)50% off your 2018 Magic Weekend ticketAccess to our Member feedback channels to engage with the Club and give us your views and opinionsDiscounted away travel via Club Travel Partner Hatton’s TravelEntry into the Ultimate Fan compJunior MembershipMembership Access CardJunior Membership holders get free access to all 2018 Saints away games (subject to availability)Entry into a draw to be a matchday mascot and walk out with the first-team before a Super League matchYour ticket reserved for additional major home games (World Club Series/Challenge Cup)All your Betfred Super League and Super 8s home games included in one great Membership packagePriority match tickets for major games including finals*Exclusive local partner offers giving you even more value with your MembershipExclusive Membership only merchandise & stadium promotional offers sent directly to you via emailExclusive invites to Member only events during 2018Discounted away travel via Club Travel Partner Hatton’s TravelEntry into the Ultimate Fan compTo buy, or take advantage of a 10 month direct debit, call into the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium or call 01744 455 052.For further information, click here.last_img read more

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Its a meeting of the Leagues top two teams with

first_imgIt’s a meeting of the League’s top two teams with Saints currently topping the Rhinos by point’s difference.“We’re really looking forward to getting back out on the field and it’s fair to say this game cannot come soon enough,” Head Coach Mark Brennan said. “It’s another big challenge for us as Leeds are unbeaten in the league and have been playing really well. We are expecting another tough and physical game.“After last week’s disappointment we have been training hard and all want to put in an improved performance.“Leeds are a good side but for us it’s about focusing on our own game, learning each week and challenging each other to improve.”He continued: “The fans have been great this season and have followed us on our travels to Bradford and Wigan as well as backing us at home.“We’re looking forward to playing in front of them again at Crusader Park in what will be another tough game but a great advert for Women’s Super League.”Saints from:Pip Birchall, Leah Burke, Rhianna Burke, Chantelle Crowl, Faye Gaskin, Lizzie Gladman, Zoe Harris, Charlotte Hill, Tara Jones, Sarah Lovejoy, Carys Marsh, Roxy Mura, Becca Rotheram, Emily Rudge, Isabelle Rudge, Dawn Taylor, Jade Ward, Katie-May Williams and Naomi Williams.The game kicks off at 2:15pm and entry is £2.last_img read more

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Brunswick Co Commissioners challenge sets up House primary battle

first_imgBRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A Brunswick County Commissioner announced this Thursday morning she is running for the NC House seat next year. Pat Sykes is taking on incumbent Representative and fellow Republican Frank Iler.Iler has won the past four elections and said he is used to running against a primary.- Advertisement – Sykes said she is looking to step outside of her county commission district and work on positive teamwork on a state level. She wants better communication between state, county, and local governments.Iler wants to continue creating jobs and lowering taxes.“I’ve been able to accomplish almost anything the county wants and I’ve been able to improve roads and education,” Iler said. “We’ve increased education since I’ve been there from $7.5 billion to $9 billion in public education.”Related Article: 5 ex-North Carolina governors rebuke lawmakers on amendments“One of the main objectives is keeping taxes low and pushing to pay as we go with parks and senior centers,” Sykes said. “That keeps us from having to borrow money for these extra benefits we want.”If Sykes wins she said the first thing she plans to do is learn all she can about the position then get to work. Iler said he would continue working on the projects he has started including a highway to connect the county with South Carolina.last_img read more

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Last chance to get tickets for Little Princess Ball

first_img There will be dancing, face painting, games and more. Princesses are encouraged to wear their prettiest dress, ball gown, or favorite princess costume.The ball is Saturday, February 17 from 3-5 p.m.There are three locations and tickets must be purchased in advance. They are $12 each.Related Article: Businesses, residents brace for impending bridge closureClick here for tickets to the Little Princess Ball at the Brunswick Center in Southport.Click here for tickets to the Little Princess Ball at the Brunswick Center in Supply.Click here for tickets to the Little Princess Ball at the Leland Cultural Arts Center. BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — This weekend, there’s an event for all the little princesses in the Cape Fear.Communities in Schools of Brunswick County and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation are teaming up once again for the Little Princess Ball. Young girls in Kindergarten through 5th Grade are welcome to attend with a father, grandfather, uncle, brother or other male role model.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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