Baghdatis on a roll as he reaches Nottingham semi-finals

first_imgMarcos Baghdatis beat Italy’s Simon Bolleli in straight sets on Thursday afternoon to reach the last four of the Aegon Open in Nottingham.The Cypriot broke once in each set to register a comprehensive 6-4 6-4 victory and he will now face Denis Istomin in the semis on Friday after the Uzbek overcame Argentina’s Leonardo Mayer in three tough sets.Baghdatis has been in good form on the grass courts this week, having beaten top seed David Ferrer on Tuesday – his first win over a Top 10 player for more than two years.And the 30-year-old, a runner-up in the Australian Open in 2006, believes there is still more to come from him.“My form has been pretty good up until this point. Everything is simple in my head and I am feeling great,” he told the Nottingham Post newspaper.“On grass it is tough to beat me for sure. I love playing in England, I love the surface and I played well before here.“It’s going to be hard to beat me, but it will also be hard to win.“There are some great players. Every match is very close. It’s the lucky man or the better player who wins.“I’m enjoying myself on tour again. There is still something in me, I’m trying to improve every single day and there is a lot more to come from me.”last_img read more

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Big guns fail to fire as lesser lights shine

first_imgTraditionally the stage on which the biggest teams parade their talents, this year’s World Cup has seen the Goliaths of international football stumble when faced with industrious opponents of a lesser stature.Brazil, Germany and Argentina have lifted 11 World Cups between them, but all failed to win their opening games in Russia, prompting questions about whether this was a temporary blip or indicative of a major shift in the balance of power.Add in 2010 champions Spain failing to beat Portugal and France’s struggle to overcome one of the supposedly weakest Australia sides in recent years and a pattern emerges.Germany’s 1-0 defeat by Mexico was not unprecedented, but was still statistically remarkable.The holders have lost their opening game before with Joachim Loew’s side joining Spain (2014), France (2002), Argentina (1990 and 1982) and Italy (1950) in suffering that ignominy.Yet this was Germany’s first opening-game defeat since 1982 and the only time in World Cup history that they, Brazil and Argentina had all failed to win their first matches.Not everyone is convinced a competition that has only had eight winners in its 88-year history has suddenly witnessed a levelling of the playing field – Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho is firmly in the blip camp.“They all will qualify and the best of these top teams will come in the knockout,” the Portuguese said.To do that, however, they will need to reassert their superiority against lesser sides on paper who seem to have collectively settled on a blueprint for frustrating more talented opponents.Argentina, who were held to a 1-1 draw by tiny Iceland, and Brazil, who shared the spoils with Switzerland, both came up against teams happy to sacrifice attacking intent in favour of rigid defensive organisation and Herculean levels of industry.Mexico took it one stage further, combining a defensive wall with a rapid-fire counter-attack that left Germany’s ageing rearguard outgunned.Manning the barricades is not a new idea for smaller countries hoping to upset the odds.GREATER PEDIGREECosta Rica showed four years ago in reaching the quarter-finals that the ability to frustrate opponents with a far greater pedigree can take you a long way, while Iceland’s run to the quarters at Euro 2016 was the latest example of how caution has become a reliable means of over-achieving.Germany’s efforts to break down Mexico seemed particularly futile – the more resources they committed to attack, the more they looked vulnerable to the counter-punch.Even their own players could see they had fallen into carefully laid trap, with centre back Mats Hummels saying Germany’s failure to plug defensive holes had been the subject of “internal” discussions.Breaking down a heavily-manned defence is of course harder when your star turn does not join the party and Brazil and Argentina will want to see more from their talismanic talents.Lionel Messi, the game’s master magician who is yet to lift a senior international trophy, looked like the weight of the world was on his shoulders as he missed a penalty against Iceland.Brazil’s Neymar, the most expensive soccer player on the planet, fared no better as he made his competitive return after a lengthy injury absence against Switzerland.The Paris St Germain forward spent much of the match rolling on the floor as the Swiss, who committed 19 fouls, 10 of which were on Neymar, tested his injured foot.With players like Neymar and Messi under-par, the fear of facing Brazil or Argentina is somewhat lessened.As the tournament wears on it will become apparent whether it has gone for good or will return with a vengeance.last_img read more

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Path cleared for Nadal but obstacles remain at US Open

first_imgOnly Matteo Berrettini stands between Rafa Nadal and a fifth final at Flushing Meadows where the stage has been all but cleared for the Spaniard to claim a 19th grand slam title.The draw always looked kind to second seed Nadal, who was guaranteed of avoiding fellow greats Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer until the final.But with those two swept away on the other side of the draw, Nadal instead will meet either Daniil Medvedev or Grigor Dimitrov if he gets to Sunday’s final.First the Spaniard must get past 23-year-old Italian Berrettini in what will be the pair’s first encounter.Big serving Berrettini is having a breakout year, with two titles under his belt, one on grass and one on clay, and is now on the brink of becoming the first Italian male grand slam finalist in more than 40 years.While a well-rested Nadal has breezed through to the final four, dropping only one set and even enjoying a walkover in the second round, Berrettini has shed sweat and tears to claw his way this far.Taken to four sets in each of his first three matches by unseeded opponents, he was later stretched to the limit by Gael Monfils in a quarter-final thriller on Wednesday that went to a final-set tiebreak.How well Berrettini, in his eighth grand slam, recovers from that four-hour marathon could be crucial.Meanwhile, Medvedev has ridden a hot streak into the other semi-final, where he unexpectedly finds himself up against an opponent few expected to go deep into the championship.Medvedev has a 19-2 record since Wimbledon, racking up three straight appearances in finals, losing in Washington and Montreal before claiming the Cincinnati title.The Russian fifth seed has continued his winning run at the U.S. Open, though his path has not been without obstacles and been taken to four sets in each of his past four matches.His run at Flushing Meadows is the deepest he has gone in a Grand Slam but in the semi-finals faces a resurgent Dimitrov who is brimming with confidence after beating Federer in a five-set quarter-final.The Bulgarian, who has slipped down the rankings to 78th from a high of third, arrived in New York having been eliminated in the first round in five of his six previous tournaments but now stands on the brink of his first Grand Slam final.last_img read more

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Latam Eco Review: Colombia’s last nomadic tribe faces extinction

first_imgArticle published by Maria Salazar Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Palm Oil, Wildlife center_img Below are summaries of the most popular stories by our Spanish language service, Mongabay Latam, from the week of April 30 – May 6. Among the top articles: more than 20 families of the last nomadic indigenous peoples of Colombia face a serious food crisis. In other news, a new app allows fisherfolk and others in ports and markets to monitor fish in the Amazon river basin.The image above of an elephant weevil (Orthorhinus cylindrirostris) from the vast Mongabay archive was the most popular on Latam’s social networks.Colombia’s last nomadic tribe faces extinctionThe Nukak Makú often need to share a chicken among more than 70 people. Image by Alberto Castaño for Mongabay.The Nukak Makú, the last nomadic indigenous, contacted peoples of Colombia, are on the brink of disappearance. Deforestation, invasions into their ancestral territories, displacement, along with a cultural and environmental degradation from bureaucracy, are making it impossible for the Nukak to manage their lands – or feed themselves.Underwater spiders: the strange lives of intertidal spidersA male Bob Marley spider (Desis bobmarley) discovered in Port Douglas in Queensland, Australia. Image courtesy of Robert RavenA spider named for reggae legend Bob Marley is a new member of 15 species of intertidal spiders. At this point, scientists have registered intertidal spiders along the coasts of Australia, New Zealand, the south of Africa, the Pacific islands and India. The spider can stay under water for up to 24 hours due to a notable adaptation: small water repellent hairs, known as hydrophobic hairs, that trap air around it.App enables citizen scientists to monitor fish and water quality in Amazon basinA total of 21 species of migratory fish in the Amazon basin will be monitored by the Ictio app. Image by Yvette Sierra Praeli.An ambitious citizen science project that extends across Bolivia, Peru, Colombia and Ecuador proposes to create a volunteer network to monitor fish and evaluate water quality through the simple download of a cellphone application. Low internet access in rainforest communities presents the main challenge.Nine thousand small turtles return home to the jungle in PeruBaby turtles repatriated to Peru, after Dutch authorities observed poor transport conditions. They were due to arrive in Asia but ended up at the Amazonian Rescue Center. Image by Yvette Sierra PraeliThe Amazonian Rescue Center in Iquitos, Peru is caring for 9,000 turtles until they are ready to be released ino their native habitat in the Pacaya Samiria National Reserve. Their return is part of a repatriation process approved by the administrative authority of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna in Holland, where they were confiscated.Peru: Indigenous Andean communities save forests from narcotraffickersAll families cultivate yuca, banana, tannia tubers, peanuts, sugar cane, coffee, and cacao. Most of the production is for their consumption. Image by Jack Lo for Mongabay.Seven Machiguenga indigenous communities seek to protect more than 260,000 hectares of forest in southern Peru from narcotrafficking. This area has the highest concentration (69%) of land dedicated to illegal coca cultivation. They seek recognition of part of their territory as a Regional Conservation Area.Honduras: African palm hits the heart of Kawas ParkAfrican palm has eaten away 11% or 9140 hectares of the Kawas Park. In the last 20 years, more than 2254 hectares of forest, more than 4500 soccer fields, have been lost. Image by Jessica Guifarro.The majority of the 89 communities in the Jeanette Kawas National Park in northern Honduras are growing African palm, resulting in 11% deforestation of this protected area. Residues from fertilizers and chemicals used in the cultivation of African palm have also caused an accumulation of organic residues in Los Micos Lake. Read about these stories in Spanish here.last_img read more

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Meaningful lives

first_imgHappiness is the goal of human life. In our quest to give substance to our independence, our leaders have focused all our efforts towards increasing the production of goods and services that comprise our “Gross National Product” (GDP).The presumption is that those goods and services form the basis of happiness. Other countries, including some in Europe however, have since followed the lead of Nepal, which insists that governments must work to improve the “happiness” of their citizens.But even apart from the difficulties of measuring “happiness” there are disagreement as to how exactly do we pursue it. Studies have shown the manner in which citizens seek and respond to those material rewards which make up much of the GDP is part of what determines their overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joys that mankind seeks. The first is “hedonia” – from which we have the word “hedonistic” – the path of wine, women (or men) and song. This is the dominant conception of “happiness” in the modern world. But there was also eudemonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.While this is not spoken about much nowadays, recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of pleasure, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudemonic rewards.This suggests that the suggestions made by some concerned citizens to introduce “civic” education back into our school curriculum are on the right track both in terms of creating happier citizens and also a more cohesive nation.This approach is not based only on speculations but has recently been backed by scientific evidence. Over the years, scientists have found they can measure the quantum of a person’s enjoyment of something by taking MRIs of activation levels in the ventral striatum—the “reward centre” nestled in the bullseye of the brain. It seems this part of the brain of teens is particularly sensitive in responding to all kinds of rewards. It is because of this phenomenon late adolescence is also when depression peaks for many youths, because of being frustrated in not getting enough “enjoyment”.In one study, researchers aimed to figure out how the brains of adolescents reacted to the more consumption-based rewards, like video games and drugs, versus the more pro-social ones, like “helping others in need, expressing gratitude, and working toward long-term goals.” Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers followed a group of 39 teenagers over the course of one year to see whether the way their brains reacted to either eudemonic or hedonic rewards correlated with how depressed they felt over time.It turned out the teens who were more giving of their efforts had the greatest declines in depressive symptoms over time. And those who got a boost from the risk-taking game were more likely to have an increase in depression. The types of reward the teens responded to, it seems, changed their behaviour in ways that altered their overall well-being.While it might not be possible to change the ingrained reactions of our adults, we have to begin to inculcate our youths, who are two/thirds of our population, with civic virtues.After we commemorated our fifty years of Independence, there are few who will gainsay we have not achieved the goals set on May 26, 1966. But as we embark on rectifying that circumstance let us at least incorporate in our plans what we have discovered as to be the meaning of the “good life”.While man does need “bread” for living, being a social being he needs to find meaning for his life in his relationships with others even as he works for that bread.last_img read more

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Lionesses lose bronze to Tribe in Dubai 7s

first_imgKevin Wambua’s charges were left playing catch up in this fixture, finding themselves 12-0 down inside the opening three minutes.They would breach the Belgian try line, Janet Okello landing the opening try but Janet Owino inexplicablt missed the center post conversion.Celestine Masinde would soon add a second try, Owino tying the score with a conversion on the stroke of half time.The second half was barren and error strewn despite the Lionesses putting Belgium on the ropes.They were left rueing their missed chances when the Belgians, in a rare spell of possession midway through the first half of extra, capitalized on indecisive defending from Kenya to score and book a berth in the final against Samurai.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Kenya Lionesses taking on Belgium in Dubai Sevens.PHOTO/KRUNAIROBI, Kenya, Dec 2 – The national women’s sevens team lost 17-10 to Tibe in the bronze match at the Dubai Sevens International Invitational Category on Friday.The Kenya Lionesses reached the bronze play-off after a sudden death 17-12 semifinal loss to Belgium.last_img read more

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Labels may reveal origin of meat

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A striking contradiction is on display on American grocery shelves: Labels tell shoppers where their imported seafood was caught, but there is no telling where the meat, produce or nuts came from. That dichotomy is reflective of the distribution of political power in Washington, where lobbyists and members of Congress have managed to hold off enforcement of a five-year-old law that required country-of-origin labeling on meat and produce as well as fish. Now, with Democrats in control of Congress and questions about the safety of food imported from China, proponents of the labeling law believe they finally have momentum on their side. After all, they say, how are consumers supposed to avoid potentially contaminated products from China or anywhere else unless they carry labels describing where they are from? But the labeling law has formidable foes, including the powerful meat lobby, which to date has outmaneuvered its opponents on Capitol Hill. In the years since the labeling law took effect as part of the 2002 Farm Bill, its opponents have successfully blocked all but seafood labeling from taking effect. Opponents of the law believe that it is too onerous and expensive and is simply a way for American farmers and ranchers to block cheaper foreign competitors. Besides, they say, if Americans wanted country-of-origin labels so badly, why aren’t retailers voluntarily rushing to offer it, as they do with hormone-free milk or organic foods? “No one was prohibited from putting labels on products,” said Rep. Henry Bonilla, R-Texas, who as head of the appropriations subcommittee on agriculture pushed through delays of mandatory origin labeling. “If consumers wanted this, they could have demanded it.” Critics say meatpackers simply do not want consumers to know that an increasing amount of hamburger meat and produce is being imported. The fate of the country-of-origin labeling, known as COOL for short, will likely be resolved in coming months as Congress rewrites farm policy and decides how to spread its money among various agricultural needs in the coming year. The battle over the labeling law comes at a time when American farmers are facing increasing competition from all corners of the world: soybeans from Brazil, wheat from Ukraine and apples from China, to name a few. American consumers, meanwhile, are eating more and more food grown and processed overseas. During the last decade, the amount of imported food has roughly doubled, to $65.3 billion in 2006. The law required country-of-origin labeling on beef, pork, lamb, fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood and peanuts. To date, the debate has mainly been driven by the meat industry, with the produce and peanut industries playing a much quieter role. The trajectory of the labeling law to date has largely been defined by political power in Washington. The meat lobby has historically been a powerful and efficient operation in Washington, with deep ties on Capitol Hill and the Department of Agriculture. Along with the grocery industry, the meat lobby has waged an effective campaign to stymie efforts to implement the law. But the advocates of the measure are hardly free of political self interest. The biggest supporters of the labeling law in Congress come from Great Plains states where ranchers face stiff competition from Canada. And, a key reason why seafood labeling was pushed through in 2005? Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, was chairman of the powerful Senate Appropriations Committee at the time. He also happens to represent Alaska fishermen, who benefited from a provision in the law that fish and shellfish include not only country of origin but whether it was farm-raised of caught in the wild. Today, both sides of the debate over origin labeling say that the seafood labels prove their arguments. For instance, in March, the Food Marketing Institute, a trade organization, said seafood labeling had cost 10 times more than original estimates and failed to increase sales of American seafood. But the United Fishermen of Alaska tell a different story, saying origin labeling has increased demand and prices for their wild salmon. And with the current concerns about Chinese seafood, labeling of seafood gives consumers the option to buy something else, advocates say. The push for origin labeling started in the mid-1990s, when cattle ranchers grew frustrated by the influx of imported beef, particularly from Canada, as a result of trade agreements that opened the border to imports. To this day, cattle ranchers remain the primary advocates of the labeling measure. The thinking behind the proposal was that, given a choice, consumers would likely choose products from the United States over imported ones, even if they cost more. But origin labeling is not just about patriotism or a desire to help American farmers. Part of its appeal is better food oversight, and some proponents of the measure have played to consumer anxiety by calling into question the safety of meat from places like Mexico, Uruguay and Canada. China exports a negligible amount of meat to the United States. “The consumer, upon seeing the USDA label, would naturally presume that it’s a U.S. product,” said Bill Bullard, chief executive of the Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal fund, United Stockgrowers of America, an organization of cattle ranchers better known as R-Calf. He said the effect for meatpackers was that “they are able to bring in a cheaper product and sell it under the reputation of the U.S. cattle industry.” Opponents of origin labeling say the measure is simply protectionism, aided by false claims about imported products. American meatpackers may stop buying foreign cattle altogether given the costs of segregating and keeping track of foreign-born cattle. They also say it would be difficult and expensive to label ground meat like hamburger, since it often includes meat from many cows. “They talk about how the quality is better in the United States,” said Mark D. Dopp, senior vice president for regulator affairs and general counsel for the American Meat Institute, a trade group. “The standards are all the same. For these people to talk about how all this inferior product is coming in, it’s just nonsense.” Legislation for origin labeling floundered until the 2002 Farm Bill was coming together, in part because of a strong push by then Senate Majority Leader Thomas A. Daschle, D-S.D., where support for the labeling law is strong. As a compromise, origin labeling was made voluntary for the first two years before becoming mandatory in 2004. But those efforts were quickly undone by the meat lobby. Just after the law was passed, the secretary of agriculture at the time, Ann Veneman, called it “unfortunate” and suggested that origin labeling could violate trade agreements, drawing a strong rebuke from the law’s advocates in Congress. During Veneman’s tenure, the top ranks of the Department of Agriculture included executives with ties to the meatpacking industry. For instance, her chief of staff, Dale Moore, was the former head of legislative affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the same trade group that employed her director of communications, Alisa Harrison, and the deputy under secretary, Charles Lambert, who would have overseen the origin labeling program. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, which represents both ranchers and meatpackers, opposes origin labeling. The Department of Agriculture estimated that the cost of paperwork to manage the program in its first year would be $1.9 billion, a figure the Government Accountability Office said was questionable and not supported by the agency’s records. But the real undoing of origin labeling occurred in Congress. In 2003, a year before the labeling was supposed to go into effect, Bonilla pushed through a delay of mandatory origin labeling for another two years. Two years later, again largely because of Bonilla’s efforts, the House passed an appropriations bill that prohibited the Department of Agriculture from spending money on implementing origin labeling until September 2007. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonpartisan group that tracks campaign spending, Bonilla received $158,328 in campaign funds in 2006 from the livestock industry, making him the top recipient in Congress. He was also the top recipient of campaign funds from the livestock industry in 2004, with $132,900, and ranked second in 2002, with $78,350. Bonilla, who was defeated in 2006 by Ciro Rodriguez, said it was common for committee chairmen to receive contributions from the industry that they oversee. Besides, he said his congressional district was a huge cattle ranching and agricultural region. Bonilla does not dispute that he delayed the implementation of the labeling law. But he said it was a bad idea that would be costly to not only cattle producers and meatpackers but grocery stores as well. But now, with Democrats in charge of Congress, advocates of the labeling law are attempting to mount their own lobbying and public relations blitz on Capitol Hill. And for now, they are receiving a warmer welcome from some leaders in Congress. For instance, Bonilla’s successor, Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Ct., is a supporter of the labeling law. DeLauro received $100,750 in campaign contributions from agribusiness in her 2006 campaign, $4,000 of which came from the livestock industry. “There will be mandatory COOL by 2008 at the latest,” she said. last_img read more

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WELCOME ADDITION San Pedro park opens today as gateway from Harbor Freeway

first_img“First impressions are lasting impressions and our new park will finally give the right impression for our community,” Hahn said. “The new park, in conjunction with all of the (replanting) work that Caltrans is doing at the off-ramp will be a huge improvement in San Pedro.” Hussey is hopeful that some of the other adjacent parcels can be added to expand the park over time. A decorative water fountain included in the original plans could be added in a subsequent phase, the council office said. “It looks great,” Hussey said. “It’s not the way we envisioned it originally, but it looks really nice. It’s a beautiful job.” Some have raised concerns about whether the passive park will only draw transients and graffiti. Hussey has suggested that a security camera be installed. “It’s in the worst part of San Pedro and it’s going to be littered and graffitied,” said Paul Fisher of San Pedro, a freelance graphic designer who said he’d rather see the money spent on fixing the road pavement on Gaffey Street from the freeway to Ninth Street. “Forget the park, fix Gaffey,” he said. “That road has been in disrepair for 10 years. Instead, I see a fancy little park while I have to get my front-end realigned every two months.” The city of Los Angeles is working to get that section of Gaffey transferred from Caltrans to city jurisdiction so the repairs can be made, the council office said. The flagpoles that were on the median on Gaffey have been moved to inside the park. No decision has been made yet about whether to tear down the foot bridge above the street near the park. The landmark bridge has been a magnet for trash and graffiti. Meanwhile, Caltrans also is finishing a $2 million replanting project at the end of the Harbor Freeway from Gaffey to Channel streets and along Gaffey to Harbor Boulevard. “Finally, after a long, tiring congestion-plagued commute on the 110 Freeway, people will love coming to the end of the 110 and entering our wonderful town,” Hahn said. donna.littlejohn@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! A formal dedication of the park is planned for 9 a.m. Sept. 24. Among those attending will be Jim Hussey, the San Pedro insurance agent who first proposed the idea of a welcome park more than a decade ago. “Can you believe this? It’s actually happening. I had to drive by there today just to make sure,” Hussey said of the work finished this week by the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department. But what seemed like a simple idea in the beginning turned out to be complicated to execute, ultimately involving a complex land-swap deal with the Port of Los Angeles so that court settlement money could be used. Hahn said the park has been a priority for her, with the councilwoman promising earlier this year that the project would be done before the end of summer. The idea was to spruce up San Pedro’s entry off the Harbor (110) Freeway. Greeting motorists for years have been a series of dilapidated properties. While some blighted parcels still exist, the new welcome park replaces old buildings with an attractive, if small, landscaped vista at the town’s most-traveled entry point. By Donna Littlejohn STAFF WRITER San Pedro’s long-awaited welcome park opens today, replacing a shuttered old gas station with a 1.1-acre expanse of green grass, trees, decorative stone and a standard of flags. “We finally have a proper gateway into San Pedro that truly reflects how great this community is,” said Los Angeles City Councilwoman Janice Hahn in a written statement. “The park is now officially open.” last_img read more

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District, city pay for another school cop

first_img“There are different elements we want to keep off our campuses,” she said. “We also want to keep drugs and alcohol down.” The city has paid the cost of a sheriff’s deputy to work mainly out of La Mirada High since 2001. But the district recently obtained a state grant that will allow it to pay half the cost of another deputy in La Mirada and one in Norwalk, Shattuck said. The cost for each city will be $81,000 and for the district $162,000. The district had paid half the cost of a deputy from 1993 to 2001, but stopped when a grant ran out. But this new safety grant is renewable, so the program should continue, Shattuck said. LA MIRADA – The school district and the city have agreed to split the cost of a second sheriff’s deputy to work in schools here. Ginger Shattuck, , said the new deputy will help prevent problems by working closely with all of the schools in La Mirada. “They know what’s going on in the community and the school and help to ensure any issues that might be of a potential safety concern are caught early,” Shattuck said. The deputies also provide intelligence, allowing preventive measures to be done to keep the schools safe, she said. The new deputy should be working by mid-October, she said. Lt. Bob Esson of the sheriff’s La Mirada station said the new deputy will be a great help to the community. Pat Unkle, the existing deputy, is spread thin, Esson said. “They’ll be able to assist schools to an even greater degree,” Esson said. For example, deputies meet regularly with school officials to discuss specific problems. Unkle also does other things for the schools – from speaking in a class to putting together a program to deal with truancies, he said. “He’s worth his weight in gold,” Esson said. With a second deputy, they also will be able to do a better job of getting out to the three middle schools and the six elementary schools, he said. superintendent of the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District mike.sprague@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Winks insists his side can win league and says Spurs will never ‘stop believing’

first_img MONEY 3 Latest Football News Winks is enjoying a good run of form in Poch’s side Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ Pochettino;s men face United at Wembley on Sunday “There’s still a long way to go for the rest of the season, there’s a lot of big games to try and win.“We’re hoping that results go our way from other teams as well. You know, we don’t stop believing so hopefully things can go well for us in the last few games of the season.”Tottenham and Manchester United meet at Wembley on Sunday at 4.30pm.You can listen to all of the action on talkSPORT. 3 no dice ADVICE huge blow Winks has said his side have what it takes to win the title 3 BEST OF REVEALED Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury center_img Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Tottenham midfielder Harry Winks has insisted Spurs can win the league and has claimed his side will never “stop believing” in title glory.The 22-year-old is enjoying a good run of games in Mauricio Pochettino’s side, who are currently six points adrift of table-toppers Liverpool. Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move REVEALED Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade Speaking on BBC’s Football Focus ahead of their clash against Manchester United, Winks claimed Spurs have shown what it takes to be champions, but admitted important points have been dropped.He said: “We believe we’re good enough to win the league, we’ve shown on many occasions that we are.“I think there’s been a couple of games here and there that we probably should have won. Watford away and probably Wolves at home are two games that were key for us that we should have won but we didn’t. Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? RANKED Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card REPLY Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions shining Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester starslast_img read more

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